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USCB Research and Scholarship Day

List of Abstracts in the Category of Descriptive (Total 14)

Abstract ID:48
Abstract Title:La Isla and Latin Music Festival Experience
Student:.Connor Anderson (csa2@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Lukasz Pawelek (LPAWELEK@uscb.edu)
Author List: Connor Anderson
Program: Humanities
Abstract Category: Descriptive

Abstract:
Hospitality major has prepared me to work and be around people in a festival environment. My Spanish major facilitated communicative and logistics aspects during this experience. Being able to communicate with bi-lingual speakers of Spanish and English allowed me to establish stronger level of connections while hospitality education has prepared me to apply my knowledge in the co-organization of the 2016 Latin Music Fest. In this presentation I will discuss my real life experience, Latino Community and its Growing Consumer Culture in the Low Country. Within this context, I will discuss the implementation of Hospitality and Spanish education which helped me apply classroom knowledge into the real world experience. The presentation will consist of a virtual poster (Prezi Online Presentation) and will feature data from 2013 census.

Abstract ID:55
Abstract Title:Beneficial Microbes Associated with White Sharks and Tiger Sharks: Implications for wound-healing and drug discovery
Student:.Daniel Conrad (dconrad@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Kim Ritchie (kritch@uscb.edu)
Author List: Daniel Conrad, Aubree Denton, Michalee Ford, Danielle Young, Diego Agudelo Gil, Kim Ritchie
Program: Natural Sciences
Abstract Category: Descriptive

Abstract:
Members of the subclass Elasmobranchii are cartilaginous fish that include sharks, skates and rays. Elasmobranchs have an extraordinary ability to heal dermal wounds rapidly, although the mechanisms behind this phenomenon are unknown. The Ritchie lab is conducting studies to explore innate immunity and beneficial bacterial associations that may play a role in wound healing in sharks. Recent studies from this lab have focused on the isolation of novel antimicrobials from bacterial associates of ray and skate species. At USCB, our objectives are to survey bacteria associated with the epidermal surfaces of the white shark (Carcharodon carcharias) and tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier) in order to address 1) shark epidermal surface-derived antibiotic activities, 2) bacterial roles in this activity and 3) shark bacteria as a novel source of antibiotics. To date we have cultured and purified over 960 bacteria from two white sharks and two tiger sharks that were captured off of the coast of Hilton Head Island, SC, in March of 2017. Shark bacteria are undergoing screening for antibiotic potential against a panel of gram-positive and gram-negative test pathogens. Future work will include a) surveys to compare innate immunity across elasmobranchs, b) beneficial bacteria as a health proxy for tiger sharks of Port Royal Sound, and c) the first shark microbiome project.

Abstract ID:39
Abstract Title:Systematic Observation of Communication Between Soccer Players and Coaches at the High School and Collegiate Levels
Student:.Cameron Crony-Clark (cronycc@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Brett Borton (bortonb@uscb.edu)
Author List: Cameron Crony-Clark
Program: Social Sciences
Abstract Category: Descriptive

Abstract:
Effective communication has been identified as a critical part of talent development in young soccer players and is often tied to player achievements and well-being. Researchers have systematically observed coach behavior in both practice and game situations, but little research has been done on the different communication styles required for high school and college players. The purpose of this research is to identify the styles and patterns of effective communication, both verbal and non-verbal, between and among coaches and players at the high school and college levels. Using systematic observation, the research seeks to determine how communication is used to build player/coach and player/player relationships, and the differences in communication at the high school and college level. The analysis will consider elements of verbal communication (delivery, tone, positive and negative content as feedback) and non-verbal (body language, facial expressions, hand gestures, eye contact). Other variables to be considered include player efficacy (knowledge of the sport), maturity, willingness to learn, and parental involvement.

Abstract ID:42
Abstract Title:Student-led Health & Wellness Fairs: Attempting to Increase Awareness of Local Health Services
Student:.Sharonica Gavin (gavins@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Diana Reindl (DREINDL@uscb.edu)
Author List: Sharonica Gavin, Jayln Washington, Ruth Eklund, Rhianna Lewis, Jeffrey Lewis & Diana Reindl, PhD, CHES
Program: Nursing and Health Professions
Abstract Category: Descriptive

Abstract:
Background Student-led health and wellness fairs have the potential to increase awareness of local health services for all community members. Previous research on student-led health fairs have found that such events can have a measurable, positive impact on members of the community it serves (Squiers, Purmal, Silver, & Gimpel, 2015). The purpose of USCB’s annual Health & Wellness Fair is to increase health awareness through education and prevention. The purpose of this project was to evaluate vendor and attendee satisfaction of 2016 participants. Methods Four USCB bodies, the Health Promotion Club (HPC), Student Nursing Association (SNA), Athletics and Student Life co-planned the 2016 4th Annual Health and Wellness Fair. The HPC evaluated those considered as active participants of the day’s events. A master list of local health businesses and organizations was used to send invitations to 60 potential local health and wellness vendors. Alternative strategies to invite potential vendors included in-person and over the phone conversations. In total, 37 vendors participated and evaluation surveys were used to determine satisfaction among health and wellness fair participants. Results There were 136 “active participants” active being those who interacted with at least 10 vendors. Majority of active participants were students (93%), female (85%) and 18-25 (86%). A strong majority (74%) “strongly agreed” the Health and Wellness Fair educated them on new local useful resources to better their health, that it was beneficial (71%), and encouraged them toward a healthier lifestyle (60%). Conclusions Students and vendors were highly satisfied with the event. Students were satisfied in that they found the health fair to be beneficial and learned of new local useful health resources. Vendors were satisfied with the set-up and organization of the event along with the networking opportunity presented.

Abstract ID:65
Abstract Title:Perceptions of Tourism in the Lowcountry: A case study of Beaufort County, South Carolina
Student:.Nicole Hinnant (nhinnant@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Nancy Hritz (NHRITZ@uscb.edu)
Author List: Nicole Hinnant, Dr. Nancy Hritz, Associate Professor, Dr. John Salazar, Professor, Dipl.-Soz. Anton AbrahamResearch Associate
Program: Hospitality Management
Abstract Category: Descriptive

Abstract:
Abstract Resident perceptions of tourism are important for economic growth and development of an area. It is important to obtain acceptance from local citizens within a community and ensure that future developments meet their needs without compromising plans of generations to come. To sustain tourism within an area “a positive approach intending to reduce tensions and frictions created by the complexity of interactions between tourism industry, tourist, natural environment and the local communities” (Dumbraveanu, 2016, p. 78) must be implemented. One way to ensure that we meet the needs of the local community is to gauge resident’s opinion of the current state of tourism in their community and welcome suggestions to shape its future. A trained team of research assistants with the Lowcountry and Resort Islands Tourism Institute conducted telephone surveys during the summer of 2016 using a database of all registered voters in Beaufort County. A total of 3859 calls were made with 554 willing participants and completed responses over the data collection period. This yielded a response rate of 14.3%. The survey asked basic demographic questions such as age, gender, income level, ethnicity, and marital status. In addition, the resident was asked about their perceptions of the economic, environmental and social/cultural impacts tourism has on their community. The results indicate that residents do support tourism in the area. Furthermore, they are most likely to support it if they feel a benefit themselves as was revealed in a regression model. Community and cultural benefits explained most of the variance in the model. These were aspects of tourism that lead to additional cultural attractions for residents such as festivals and theatrical performances. Furthermore, residents appreciate that tourism has attributed to a greater number of restaurants, activities and other attractions that they can also enjoy.

Abstract ID:47
Abstract Title:Miranda V. Arizona in Historical Context
Student:.Theodora Huszagh (Thuszagh@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Mac James (tjames@uscb.edu)
Author List: Theodora Huszagh, Mac James
Program: Humanities
Abstract Category: Descriptive

Abstract:
The judicial precedent established by the Supreme Court in its landmark decision <i>Miranda V. Arizona</i> endures today. The procedural safeguards established by this case for the protection of the accused -known commonly as Miranda rights— remain widely regarded as some of the most important granted to criminal defendants. Miranda rights are pervasive through popular culture from cop shows on television, to songs on the radio, and in the fifty years following the decision, few rights guaranteed to Americans in criminal proceedings enjoy such universal recognition among the general public. But who was Ernesto Miranda and how did his case go all the way to the Supreme Court? This poster puts this famous Supreme Court case in the context of its time and place.

Abstract ID:8
Abstract Title:An Educational Intervention to Promote Healthy-lifestyle choices among Middle Schoolers in Jasper County, SC
Student:.Madison Johnson (mej4@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Swati DebRoy (SDEBROY@uscb.edu)
Author List: Madison Johnson, Monique Whitely, Valerie Muehleman, Lydia Breland, Swati Debroy, PhD, Alan Warren, MPH, PhD
Program: Mathematics and Computational Science
Abstract Category: Descriptive

Abstract:
A salad bar option has been introduced for the first time to the existing lunch program at Hardeeville-Ridgeland Middle School in Jasper County, SC. Data are being collected on the frequency with which students opt for the salad bar option over traditional menu items. Additionally, students’ BMI, race, gender and socioeconomic status are recorded to enable the examination of associations of these personal attributes with salad bar usage. An integral part of this research effort is the design and implementation of an educational intervention program focused on eating healthy and being active. This program was implemented in the middle of the academic year, allowing an analysis of salad bar usage pre- and post-educational campaign. The educational campaign was delivered passively with informational posters in the cafeteria, and actively, through a 30-minute presentation in every classroom by undergraduate and medical school students. Key concepts of the educational program delivered via a video and slide presentation included: 1) the nationally recognized 5-2-1-0 childhood obesity prevention program 2) the importance of eating breakfast; 3) MyPlate with 3-dimensional food models to demonstrate appropriate portion sizes. To reinforce these concepts, a Bingo game on nutrition with prizes to incentive participation was also played. This research will allow the determination of the effectiveness of the content and delivery of the educational campaign and also its usefulness beyond the one Middle school that was treated.

Abstract ID:41
Abstract Title:Music and Dance in Disney animations
Student:.Bradley Lamb (Btlamb@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Topher Maraffi (cmaraffi@uscb.edu)
Author List: Bradley Lamb
Program: Fine Arts
Abstract Category: Descriptive

Abstract:
This poster discusses the impact that music and dance had on the animation industry, focusing on Walt Disney’s contribution. The research questions I address in this poster are: when music had entered animation? what effects did music and dance have on story and character progression? and how did all this impact the audience? The reference material for this research poster was obtained online, using scholarly databases, and from print sources.

Abstract ID:38
Abstract Title:The Delayed Implementation of Brown v. Board of Education
Student:.Logan McFee (lmcfee@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Mac James (tjames@uscb.edu)
Author List: Logan McFee
Program: Humanities
Abstract Category: Descriptive

Abstract:
Brown v. Board of Education was a landmark case in which the United States could have achieved complete racial equality. The decision of the case, which was handed down on May 17, 1954, struck down the “separate but equal” clause that had been the courts’ precedent for almost 60 years. The decision could have ended segregation in schools in one day, and ideologically, it did. However, the physical reality of the deep south would quickly become a turbulent and volatile area. This presentation will look at some of the ways in which the Brown v. Board of Education was delayed, blocked, and protested.

Abstract ID:64
Abstract Title:“Let’s Make A Slave:” Hegemony, Self-Concept and the Lingering Effects of the Willie Lynch Letter.
Student:.Anthony Outing (aouting@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Brett Borton (bortonb@uscb.edu)
Author List: Anthony Outing
Program: Social Sciences
Abstract Category: Descriptive

Abstract:
This study is a critical analysis of the William Lynch Letter, a directive written for and delivered to slave owners in Virginia in 1712. Its objective was to instruct white “masters” on how to control the minds of black slaves by promoting distrust, envy, fear and hatred. While there is skepticism as to the validity of the letter, and little has been done on its historical impact, there are striking parallels between the rhetoric in the letter and a hegemonic agenda that remains in place today. Sections of the letter will be analyzed and discussed in relation to the power of hegemony and its impact on generations of African Americans. The researcher, a young African American male, argues that the powerful rhetoric expressed through the letter has shaped how African Americans view themselves (and how others view them) and how they communicate with others both inside and outside of their ethnic community.

Abstract ID:60
Abstract Title:Cooper v. Aaron (1958): The Supreme Court’s Declaration of Power
Student:.Destiny Rose (destinyr@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Mac James (tjames@uscb.edu)
Author List: Destiny Rose
Program: Humanities
Abstract Category: Descriptive

Abstract:
This project involves discovering how the important Supreme Court case Cooper v. Aaron (1958)has changed over time. Through this case, the Supreme Court set the legal precedent that every state has to comply with the Supreme Court’s ruling even if they don’t agree with the decision. The case still remains important today as a symbol of judicial power.

Abstract ID:51
Abstract Title:Ex Parte McCardle
Student:.cody solders (csolders@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Mac James (tjames@uscb.edu)
Author List: Cody Solders
Program: Humanities
Abstract Category: Descriptive

Abstract:
Historical interpretations of Supreme Court cases change overtime. This is certainly the case for the Supreme Court's landmark 1869 decision in Ex Parte McCardle. This poster will present two contrasting views from Kutler’s Ex Parte McCardle to Sever’s The McCardle Case, and will analyze their supporting evidence.

Abstract ID:40
Abstract Title:Are We Getting Through to You? Analyzing the Effectiveness of Student Evaluations at USCB in the Communication Studies Department
Student:.Courtney Suber (murrayc8@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Brett Borton (bortonb@uscb.edu)
Author List: Courtney M. Suber
Program: Social Sciences
Abstract Category: Descriptive

Abstract:
This study examines the effectiveness of student evaluations on teaching practices as well as course/curriculum improvement in USCB’s Communication Studies program. The study uses a mixed methods approach. Quantitative data has been obtained through an online survey of Communication Studies majors and descriptive analysis used to measure levels of satisfaction of program courses and curriculum. This data is supplemented by in-depth interviews with a random sample of Communication Studies majors to gain a deeper understanding of the perceptions of the program in terms of gained knowledge and acquired skills. The objective is to determine the impact of student feedback on the Communication Studies program and the degree to which faculty members use this feedback to create a more effective curriculum. Future studies should take a longitudinal approach to assess how courses/curricula and teaching methods have evolved as a result of student feedback.

Abstract ID:59
Abstract Title:Executive Order 9066; Executive Order 13769: Fear and Wartime Legislation
Student:.Lauren White (whitelh00@gmail.com)
Faculty Mentor:.Erin McCoy (emccoy@uscb.edu)
Author List: Lauren White (Dr.James advised me!)
Program: English Theater and Liberal Studies
Abstract Category: Descriptive

Abstract:
This poster analyzes Japanese internment during World War II and the Supreme Court case Korematsu v. United States. It concludes that the Supreme Court’s failure to strike down legislation motivated by irrational fear as unconstitutional has lessons for our own time. Specifically the recent executive travel ban on Muslims has many similarities with FDR’s executive order 9066 that ordered the internment of all Japanese Americans on the west coast. Both executive orders highlight an abuse of power and unconstitutional liberty restriction in times of conflict. This poster proposes a review of war and policy to prevent further injustice.