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USCB Research and Scholarship Day

List of Abstracts in the Category of Innovation Application (Total 6)

Abstract ID: 34
Abstract Title: Chess & Conquer
Student: Robert Currall (rcurrall@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor: Yiming Ji (yimingji@uscb.edu)
Author List: Robert Currall; Jeremy Suarez
Program: Mathematics and Computational Science
Abstract Category: Innovation Application

Abstract:
Chess & Conquer AbstractrnrnChess has been a game that has endured through the centuries. It started in the 6th century in India. The game became popular with other cultures and transcend national barriers. As each new culture played the game, the chess adapted to the new demographic. The biggest example is the addition of the knight. With each new iteration, chess evolved into something new. The twenty first century is no exception.rnrnThis variation of chess is designed to be an online multiplayer game. To allow for users to play each other online, a server is needed to manage all users and games, which is built using MySQL to store the information and PHP to handle incoming queries to the database. The client application which players will use to play the game is built using the Unity game engine. Users are able to join random matches as well challenge friends to a match.rnrnNow the pieces have the ability to gain skill levels like in a traditional role playing game (RPG). Each new skill level brings new movements and powers to each piece. Moreover, each player is given a set of Power Cards. The Power Cards stored on the database allows the user to modify the board and/or the players.

Abstract ID: 32
Abstract Title: Operation Orion Augmented Reality
Student: Jonathan Hilton (jbhilton@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor: Yiming Ji (yimingji@uscb.edu)
Author List: Andrew Wetmore, Carla Woods, Deep Patel, Zeyad Qatash, Darryl Dunham,Keila Calderon, Jonathan Hilton
Program: Mathematics and Computational Science
Abstract Category: Innovation Application

Abstract:
Operation Orion Augmented Reality is an augmented reality tower defense game using an application on the user’s mobile device as a way to play it. The game will be played on a table or flat surface that is seen as the game world through the user’s mobile device. The user will scan a level icon to open that level icon’s specific level using their mobile device. The object of the game is to use and upgrade various towers to defeat enemy Artificial Intelligence, whose goal is to destroy the user’s colony. Whether the user’s colony is defeated or not is the deciding factor to winning that level or not. The result of this game will be a video gaming experience using a new and innovative technology, augmented reality.

Abstract ID: 36
Abstract Title: Selection of a JavaScript Front-End Framework for the Redevelopment of SIMMER, a STEM Recitation App
Student: Alexis Miller (amm21@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor: Brian Canada (bcanada@uscb.edu)
Author List: Alexis Miller, Dr. Brian Canada
Program: Mathematics and Computational Science
Abstract Category: Innovation Application

Abstract:
STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) students face a problem of memorization versus true understanding when studying, especially due to how critical it is to gain knowledge through repetition. Many assignments and textbooks only provide a limited number of static problems, which can lead to memorization. SIMMER (Synthetic + Interactive + Immersive = Mastery through Engagement + Reinforcement) is an interactive education application for genetics courses that has been in development at USCB since 2013 and attempts to tackle this issue. It uses randomization to create virtually unlimited practice problems, which allows students to study a wider variety of problems and promotes a deeper understanding of the topic. This should result in an easier transition to real-world scenarios, which are often imperfect and not as set-in-stone as what you would encounter in your standard college textbook. SIMMER is a fairly complex software application, and the first step has been determining the best language and framework to use. It was originally built using JavaScript, the de facto standard language for creating web applications. Some of the SIMMER user interface functionality was implemented using jQuery, which historically has been a popular JavaScript library due to its ease of implementation. However, its popularity is being supplanted by faster, more powerful front-end JavaScript frameworks such as React, Vue, and Angular. As part of a need to unify the SIMMER components into a single application, the first step of this project was to determine which of these three modern frameworks will yield the best results in the shortest amount of time. All three frameworks have their strengths, but after reviewing the specific traits of each, it was determined that React would be the best choice due to an optimal combination of performance, ease of use, and long-term technical support.

Abstract ID: 60
Abstract Title: Comparative Analysis of Avian and Mammalian Embryonic Heart Development
Student: Kathryn O`Neill (kmoneill@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor: Jena Chojnowksi (jchojnow@uscb.edu)
Author List: Kathryn M. O'Neill, Jason E. Cotton, Jena Chojnowski
Program: Natural Sciences
Abstract Category: Innovation Application

Abstract:
Current research uses the mouse embryo as a model organism for human heart diseases, but with this research the chicken embryo could be an alternative model due to the better accessibility and size of the organism. A comparative analysis of avian and mammalian embryo heart development at the same stage of development will show that the two organisms have similar development of the heart at this early stage, and thus showing that chickens could be an alternative, less expensive model for human heart diseases. Using a histological approach, we compared the heart development of the mouse and the chicken at the same stage of development. Our results show that the chicken embryo does develop the heart the same as the mouse embryo. This also shows that the chicken can be used as an alternative model for the study of human heart diseases.

Abstract ID: 47
Abstract Title: Efficient Traffic
Student: Philip Peter (ppeter@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor: Debra Wallace (dwallace@uscb.edu)
Author List: Philip Peter
Program: Natural Sciences
Abstract Category: Innovation Application

Abstract:
In the last decade, Beaufort County’s resident population has surged 24.3%. Visitors, tourists, part-time residents, and commuters increase the County population on an average day by an additional 34%. In July, Hilton Head alone attracts over 40,000 visitors a day. Traffic congestion on Beaufort County’s roadways is perhaps the most noticeable and tangible effect of Beaufort County’s surge in growth and popularity. Improving infrastructure to meet demand, planned revisions to the traffic light system along the US-278 corridor will be the first in over 10 years. To quantify the data, Beaufort County has undertaken detailed study of traffic flow rates and vehicle volumes along the intersections of US-278 from Buckingham Drive to Hampton Parkway. Currently there is a high rate of congestion along US-278 during peak traffic periods Monday through Friday between 7:00-9:00, 11:00-13:00, and 15:00-17:00. This congestion causes travel delays and an increased probability of accidents, construction-related impacts, and other altercations. Working with Beaufort County, I have collected data from every intersection during the peak periods. My data quantify a change in traffic patterns along US-278 compared to historical numbers. In conjunction with an outside consultant, we are incorporating this data into an analytical model to optimize traffic flow and to assess the impacts of recent roadway improvements such as the extension of Bluffton Parkway and the flyover connecting the Parkway to the foot of the Hilton Head Bridge. Fine tuning the traffic light durations and timing at each intersection with our model results will improve the performance of the intersection, optimize traffic flow for maximum efficiency, and effectuate capacity of 1,900 cars per lane, per hour. The RBC Heritage Tournament will test the improved system’s ability to meet increased demand. For Beaufort county residents and visitors this effort means faster commutes and fewer frustrations.

Abstract ID: 61
Abstract Title: Video Games as Potential Mechanisms for Teaching Empathy
Student: Katherine Redmond (kredmond@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor: Brian Canada (bcanada@uscb.edu)
Author List: Katherine Redmond, Alexis Roberson, and Brian Canada, PhD
Program: Mathematics and Computational Science
Abstract Category: Innovation Application

Abstract:
“Empathy grows as we learn.” –Alice Miller, Psychologist and Psychoanalyst For the final project in Dr. Canada’s Fall 2017 CSCI B145 course (Java Programming & Algorithm Design I), students were tasked with designing and creating a video game in which the player could choose from different character variations (such as race, gender, personality, income level, and many other attribute types) and experience a given life or work situation from the perspective of each character variation. One of the goals of the project was that the game could be used to help the player to develop a sense of empathy for different types of people, some of whom may be able to deal with a situation easily, while other types of people might find the same situation much more difficult or even impossible to deal with. Here, we present two games that explore this topic in very different ways. In The Motions, the player chooses from one of two characters who are differently equipped to cope with the stages of grief one encounters after receiving the diagnosis of a terminal illness such as cancer. In Nuns of the World, the player explores what it is like to be a devout, monastic woman from one of two religious faiths. Both games were developed using Greenfoot, a popular educational integrated development environment for learning Java and the principles of object-oriented programming through the creation of games and simulations.