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USCB Research and Scholarship Day

List of Abstracts in the Category of Issue Based (Total 16)

Abstract ID:44
Abstract Title:The impact of the "Sex Can Wait" Education and Prevention Intervention with Teens in Hampton County, South Carolina: The ACCESS Network
Student:.Ge`Merica Beckett (BECKETGC@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Lauren Gellar (lgellar@uscb.edu)
Author List: Ge`Merica Beckett, Ms. Gwen Bampfield, MSW, JD, Shedron D. Williams, Dr. Diana Reindl PhD, CHES, and Dr. Lauren Gellar PhD, MCHES
Program: Nursing and Health Professions
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
Background: The ACCESS Network is a nonprofit organization that helps people who are affected by HIV/AIDS live with the disease. ACCESS offers free confidential HIV testing and counseling, medical case and care management, individual and legislative advocacy, nutrition programs, group and individual support programs, subsidized housing, information and referral services, and education and prevention programs. From a health viewpoint, early sexual activity among adolescents is a potential problem because of the risk of teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. Methods: The ACCESS Network “Sex Can Wait” education and prevention program is taught by staff’s member of the ACCESS Network at Estill and Hampton middle and high school. 97 students participated in this program. “Sex Can Wait” is taught after school at Estill and Hampton middle schools and once a year at Estill and Hampton high schools. Students earned extra points to their overall grades for participating. Topics discussed included safe sex, teen pregnancy, and sexually transmitted infections. The ACCESS Network developed a 10 item pre- test and post-test questionnaire to test the impact of the intervention on knowledge of the “Sex Can Wait” lessons. Results: Of the 97 students who participated in this program, 62 completed the pre and posttest questionnaires. Over half of the adolescents who attended the ACCESS Network “Sex Can Wait” education and prevention program increased knowledge from the pre- test to post-test. Student learned new information about sex and will take steps majority of the time while sexually active to prevent HIV/AIDs. Overall both Estill and Hampton middle and high school increased knowledge by 45%. Conclusion: The ACCESS Network “Sex Can Wait” education and prevention program increased the knowledge on safe sex, teen pregnancy, and sexually transmitted infections. Additional research on the impact of this program with a larger population and is warranted.

Abstract ID:28
Abstract Title:Acoustic Propagation of Fish Calls in the May River, South Carolina
Student:.Shaneel Bivek (sbivek@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Eric Montie (emontie@uscb.edu)
Author List: Shaneel Bivek1; Austin Roller1; Agnieszka Monczak1; Claire Mueller1; Eric W. Montie1
Program: Natural Sciences
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
Many fish species produce courtship calls as part of their reproductive process. In estuaries of the Southeast United States, these include species belonging to the Family Batrachoididae such as the oyster toadfish (Opsanus tau) and species belonging to the Family Sciaenidae such as Atlantic croaker (Micropogonias undulatus), black drum (Pogonias cromis), silver perch (Bairdiella chrysoura), spotted sea trout (Cynoscion nebulosus), and red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus). These courtship calls propagate outward from the source and may attract males and females to a spawning location. The purpose of this study was to determine the propagation distance of fish calls for oyster toadfish, silver perch, spotted sea trout, and red drum using the cylindrical spreading loss model. We determined the transmission loss at various distances and then subtracted these losses from species-specific source sound pressure levels (SPLs) obtained from the scientific literature. When using the cylindrical spreading loss model, the results showed that the SPL of the call followed an exponential decay as the sounds moved away from the source for oyster toadfish, silver perch, spotted sea trout, and red drum. These data will help us to better understand the function of calling in the formation of spawning aggregations. In addition, it creates a model to better understand how noise pollution such as dredging, recreational boat traffic and shipping noise may affect fish acoustic communication.

Abstract ID:49
Abstract Title:Barriers to Attendance at Peer-based Support Groups During Substance Abuse Treatment.
Student:.Oxana Dickey (odickey@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Susan Williams (scwill@uscb.edu)
Author List: Oxana Dickey
Program: Nursing and Health Professions
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
Substance use disorder is a complex disease, and quitting usually takes more than good intentions or a strong will. Peer support is a structured relationship in which people meet in order to provide or exchange emotional support with others facing similar challenges. Examples of peer support are self-help groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), Narcotic Anonymous (NA), and others. Current research indicates that active participation in any type of peer support group increases the likelihood that members will abstain from alcohol and drugs. Patients’ daily schedule during inpatient treatment for substance abuse includes attendance at peer-based therapy groups. However, some patients are resistant to this type of therapy during their hospitalization. This study explores barriers to in-patient attendance at peer-based therapy groups. Using a convenience sample of 10 participants with a primary diagnosis of substance abuse disorder, qualitative and quantitative data will be collected. Data collection will include participants’ responses to a Likert-type scale questionnaire and exploration of participants‘ perspectives on personal barriers to group attendance through the use of individual participant interviews. The qualitative interview data will be analyzed by interpreting participant information and relating it to the main objectives of the study; this may also involve identifying patterns of association between and among participant responses. The quantitative questionnaire data will be analyzed by interval data measurement and tabulation (frequency distributions & percent distributions). Analysis of the data could suggest new strategies to improve patient attendance and participation in peer-based group therapy. Findings will be shared with the staff of an in-patient behavioral health facility located in the Southeast.

Abstract ID:7
Abstract Title:Improving Nursing Communication Using Bedside Shift Report
Student:.Amanda Driggers (agillard@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Susan Williams (scwill@uscb.edu)
Author List: Amanda L Driggers, RN
Program: Nursing and Health Professions
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
Abstract In the current healthcare system, hospital funding is partially based on patient satisfaction. This is largely measured by patient responses on the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey. One of the survey’s areas of focus is Nursing Communication, which has been shown in previous published studies to improve with the implementation of nursing bedside shift report. Bedside shift report includes providing detailed information between nurses about the patient’s plan of care during each shift handoff. The purpose of this nursing research project is to implement consistent bedside shift report, and to determine whether this practice will result in improved Nursing Communication HCAHPS scores on an inpatient medical-surgical unit. Evidence-based research and expert analysis was consulted to formulate an implementation plan for this new practice. Nurses were informed of the decision and of its importance by their nurse manager via email, and discussion of the project was encouraged during a staff meeting and a shared governance meeting. After roll-out, patient rounding was conducted twice per week to gauge staff compliance, as well as patient perception of the practice. Results will be determined by HCAHPS scores, which will be examined each month to determine if nursing communication scores are gradually increasing. Baseline data for nursing communication HCAHPS scores on this unit is 66.7%, with a goal of 5% increase within three months. Consistent bedside shift report provides an environment in which the patient, as well as the nurse, can receive the information most vital for that shift, and therefore is expected to increase HCAHPS scores when practiced regularly.

Abstract ID:69
Abstract Title:Pulling Back the Curtain: A Case for a Transparent, University-Wide Writing Community
Student:.Hayley Edwards (hayleye@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Sarah Swofford (SWOFFORD@uscb.edu)
Author List: Hayley Edwards
Program: English Theater and Liberal Studies
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
This project seeks to explore the problem of student writing and the difficulty students have with transferring knowledge from first-year composition courses (FYC) to other contexts and disciplines within the university. Through secondary research, personal experience, and a survey of faculty at USCB, I conclude that one way to remedy difficulties with transfer and enhance student writing abilities is to address writing holistically on a university-wide scale. In this thesis I describe the ways in which perceptions, expectations, and practices of writing within the university are currently fragmented, and I then explain the necessity of universities moving towards a cohesive writing community with common goals and understandings about writing. I then explore ways in which this writing community can be achieved through collaboration between FYC professors, non-English faculty, and the Writing Center, as well as the implications of this type of model.

Abstract ID:23
Abstract Title:Impacts of Leishmaniasis
Student:.Kyana Grimball (Kyana@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Swati DebRoy (SDEBROY@uscb.edu)
Author List: Kyana Grimball
Program: Mathematics and Computational Science
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
Leishmaniasis Leishmaniasis remains a parasitic disease that is found in parts of the tropics, subtropics, and Southern Europe. It's importance is classified as a Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD). Leishmaniasis is caused by infection with protozoan Leishmania parasites, which are spread by the bite of phlebotomine sand flies. There are three main forms in which the most common forms are cutaneous leishmaniasis, which causes skin sores, and visceral leishmaniasis, which affects several internal organs (usually spleen, liver, and boas ne marrow). Attention to this disease is overdue as the World Health Organization (WHO) conveys an estimated 900 000–1.3 million new cases and 20 000 to 30 000 deaths occur annually. VL can be found in many areas of the world including India, Central and South America, the Mediterranean, Africa, Asia, the Middle East, China, and the Caribbean. . Risk factors include poverty, malnutrition, deforestation, and urbanization. In this review we propose to utilize [particular mathematical model] in order to estimate [the infection rate, cure, etc…]

Abstract ID:27
Abstract Title:Monitoring the Impacts of Climate Change in the Lowcountry of South Carolina – Sea Level Rise, Water Temperature, and Shifts in the Timing of Fish Reproduction
Student:.Joshua Himes (himesjr@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Eric Montie (emontie@uscb.edu)
Author List: Joshua Himes1, Jamileh Soueidan1, Ashlee Seder1, Agnieszka Monczak1, Claire Mueller1, Somers Smott1, Bradshaw McKinney1, Thomas Morgenstern1, Tony Mills2, Chris Marsh2, and Eric W. Montie1
Program: Natural Sciences
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
Climate change is rapidly impacting the world in which we live both above and below the water. It is important to closely monitor local ecosystems so that any impacts of climate change may be identified and addressed. Thus, the goal of this study is to investigate the impacts of climate change on the May River and Chechessee Creek ecosystems, specifically sea level rise, changes in estuarine temperatures, and shifts in the timing of seasonal events of marine organisms (i.e., phenological shifts). Autonomous loggers have been monitoring sea level rise and water temperature changes in the May River since 2013 and Chechessee Creek in 2016. In addition to the loggers, DSG-Ocean acoustic recorders have been collecting information on the estuarine soundscape, which helps estimate fish spawning timelines and other seasonal behaviors of marine life. The depth loggers were able to record the storm surge of Hurricane Matthew in October 2016 at three locations in the May River and two locations in Chechessee Creek. The water temperature loggers deployed in the May River showed a general increase in bottom temperature since their deployment in 2013 with a peak in 2016. A warmer spring in 2016 caused the spawning season of silver perch (Bairdiella chrysoura) to occur earlier, which could lead to phenological and/or trophic mismatches, affecting year class size. These data provide critical information regarding how sea level rise and storm surge associated with future tropical events may impact low lying coastal areas and how increasing water temperatures may affect estuarine ecosystems of the lowcountry.

Abstract ID:17
Abstract Title:Smoking Cessation Program for Family Practice
Student:.Yuliya Johnson (yjohnson@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Susan Williams (scwill@uscb.edu)
Author List: Yuliya Johnson
Program: Nursing and Health Professions
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
The 2014 Surgeon General report states smoking remains the leading preventable cause of premature disease in the United States. Clinicians continue to underutilize smoking cessation methods. To enhance screening and intervention, the World Health Organization 2014 recommendations for screening and treatment were employed in a primary care setting located in the southeast. The World Health Organization toolkit (WHO 2014) entitled “Strengthening health systems for treating tobacco dependence in primary care” was selected. The toolkit contains extensive guidance for providers to help patients who are motivated to quit, to increase motivation in those not ready to quit, and to educate patients about smoking related risks and harms. After receiving education about the project, clinicians in the practice were asked to: a) screen all adult patients for smoking history, b) offer cessation options from the toolkit to active smokers, c) offer interventions for those not ready to quit smoking from the toolkit, d) offer support for patients exposed to second hand smoke from the toolkit and e) document actions taken. At the conclusion of the three-month study period, at least 85% of patient visits should show evidence of screening for smoking history and at least 90% of patients who report to be current smokers should be offered a cessation strategy from the toolkit. Data collection from paper and/or computerized records is ongoing with a projected completion date of June 1, 2017.

Abstract ID:43
Abstract Title:Factors Impacting Lesbian Health and Wellbeing: A Systematic Review
Student:.Rhiannon Lewis (lewisrn@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Diana Reindl (DREINDL@uscb.edu)
Author List: Rhiannon Lewis,Lauren Gellar, PhD, MCHES, Diana Reindl, PhD, CHES
Program: Nursing and Health Professions
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
This research examines established factors impacting lesbians’ disproportionately lower health quality as compared to the general population. Worldwide within the last decade, research highlights successes, barriers, and concerns for the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) population. However, the need for separating these groups by specific LGBT populations remains untouched.Literature was reviewed for the term lesbian and use with terms such as: “parenting” OR “marriage” OR “same sex relationships” OR “children” OR “LGBT” OR “lesbian mothers” OR “pregnancy” OR “social support” OR “alcohol” OR “drugs” OR “violence” OR “abuse” OR “community” OR “health disparities” OR “health behavior” OR “socioeconomic status”. The initial search for primary studies used the electronic databases: Academic Search Premier, BioMed Central, MEDLINE via PubMed, PsycARTICLES, PubMed, ScienceDirect, SpringerLink Taylor & Francis Online, and Wiley Online Library. Inclusion criteria for studies included: only in the United States, since 2000.Twenty-five articles met the inclusion criteria for this review. Indeed, the literature shows a high correlation of negative experiences when disclosing being LGB that affects physical and mental health. A study by Gedro, (2014) explains how stigma leads to stress which may lead to alcoholism. Other large quantitative surveys suggest lesbians have disproportionately higher rates of binge drinking, smoking, obesity, and violence (Institute of Medicine, 2011). It's likely that negative health behaviors affect other facets of life. Research suggests lesbians have lower self-perceived happiness and desire to marry when compared to heterosexuals (Pew Research Center, 2010 & 2013). Currently, no qualitative research shows psychosocial and environmental experiences contributing to disparities among self-identifying lesbians. Research focuses on quantitative measures but provides little context from lesbians themselves, leaving the correlations uncertain. Therefore, the imperative “so what?” or reasons for these findings are not clear and further research is needed to identify possible relevant explanations.

Abstract ID:32
Abstract Title:Discrimination inside the African-American Community
Student:.Tilia Powell (tcpowell@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Najmah Thomas (nthomas2@uscb.edu)
Author List: Tilia Powell
Program: Social Sciences
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
Over the past centuries, there has been some controversy about the relationship between racism and colorism. Colorism is not a synonym for racism. This silent bias rarely gets much attention but it plays a significant role in the world of racism. Colorism is prejudice or discrimination against individuals with a darker skin tone, typically among people within the same ethnic or racial group. Its social meaning based on the skin color can be defined as an internalized form of racism or a result of white supremacy. Colorism has made a huge impact within the African American population surrounded by their emotional and psychological battles. This problem has left confusion, shame and pain inside the black community. Courage and honesty is at the core of strategies to end colorism. Regardless of the race or color, colorism has been perpetuated in many ways. It has influenced today’s society in politics, education, healthcare, crime and violence and the media. In order to heal colorism, people need to start acknowledging these problems and finding a solution to address it to the public.

Abstract ID:57
Abstract Title:Mathematical Model to Characterize Childhood Obesity in Schools
Student:.Demetrius Rhodes (drhodes@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Swati DebRoy (SDEBROY@uscb.edu)
Author List: Demetrius Rhodes, Swati DebRoy
Program: Mathematics and Computational Science
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
Nearly 1/3rd of children in the United States are classified overweight or obese. Children with a high body mass index (BMI), an indicator of excess body weight, are more likely than their normal weight counterparts to have insulin resistance, high blood pressure, asthma, depression and poor self-esteem. In addition, obese children are more likely to become obese adults. The burden of obesity and related health conditions varies among different populations. It is more prevalent among minority groups, persons of lower socioeconomic status and residents of rural areas. For nearly a decade, BMI has been measured among elementary and middle school children in Beaufort and Jasper County, SC, and analyzed by race, gender and socio-economic status. This effort has revealed an extremely high rate of obesity, prompting a research effort to understand different aspects of this epidemic and formulate effective interventions to revert the current trend. In this poster we apply a well-established SIR (susceptible-infected-recovered) differential equation model to childhood obesity data in schools of Beaufort and Jasper County, SC. Obesity has been interpreted as an infection where social influence to attain and maintain a weight status is viewed as an infection. The model is used to estimate infection parameters using the epidemiological data from the schools and quantify aspects of the obesity epidemic in the Low country. We also intend to characterize the prevalence of obesity in different schools based on their overall distribution of race and socio-economic status.

Abstract ID:68
Abstract Title:Rhetorical Analysis of Pharmaceutical Advertisements
Student:.Savannah Sheppard (crewssl@usca.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Sarah Swofford (SWOFFORD@uscb.edu)
Author List: Savannah Sheppard
Program: English Theater and Liberal Studies
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
The reality of modern society now includes the existence of direct-to-consumer advertising specifically within the realm of pharmaceutical companies. Through my research I sought to deconstruct three separate pharmaceutical advertisements specifically targeted towards those with depression and their care-givers. Along with original analysis, I conducted a brief survey of my Facebook community, and also included secondary research that was pertinent to my argument. In conclusion I found that the pharmaceutical companies who publicize these advertisements, whilst appearing ignorant, heavily rely on the use of rhetorical appeals.

Abstract ID:62
Abstract Title:Healthy Eating on a Budget; the Impact of the Healthy Columbia Cheap Eats Program in Richland County, South Carolina.
Student:.Ayanna Thomas (thoma583@uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Lauren Gellar (lgellar@uscb.edu)
Author List: Ayanna Thomas, Dr. Lauren Gellar
Program: Nursing and Health Professions
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
Background: Approximately 17% of individuals in Richland County, South Carolina are food insecure. Furthermore, 54% of South Carolina’s elderly population cannot afford to pay for both medicine and food. The Cheap Eats program was designed to provide nutritious meal plans that would fit a Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) candidates monthly budget. SNAP provides over 46 million low-income participants, more than 840,000 in South Carolina, with monthly benefits. The Cheap Eats program strives to reduce stress for hard-working or unemployed individuals coping with poverty. The purpose of the study was to assess the impact of a 7-day meal plan emphasizing healthy food choices on a budget of $5.00 a day for low socioeconomic community in Richland County. Methods: A total of 12 out of 22 patients from Healthy Columbia’s Health Screening received the meal plan and tested the recipes at 7 days. The Cheap Eats program lasted 1 day at the health screening, we educated individuals on healthy eating on a budget of $5.00 a day. Eating behaviors along with usage of the meal plan was assessed with questionnaires. The primary outcome measure was usage of the 7-day meal plan. Secondary measures were attendance of health screening. Results: 12 total patients reported using the cheap eats meal plan. Results from the pre-and posttest demonstrate there was 75% usage on at least one of the recipes from the $5.00 a day meal plan. Lessons Learned: Future implementation of this program should give patients additional time to analyze meal plans. To increase knowledge additional nutrition education should be provided and to increase mastery of experience, cooking skills should be practiced. Assessment was completed via phone, completing assessment in person may be beneficial. Conclusion: The Cheap Eats program can assist a low socioeconomic community in learning how to eat healthy on a budget.

Abstract ID:29
Abstract Title:Damaging Rewards
Student:.London Walter (lwalter@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Elizabeth Brinkerhoff (EBRINKER@uscb.edu)
Author List: London I. Walter
Program: Education
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
In theory, the behaviorist method concerning reward and punishment seems to be an effective approach, but there are three detrimental effects: lack of morality development, lack of intrinsic motivation, and long term behaviors are not achieved. Nevertheless, the use of rewards and punishment still governs many classrooms. In contrast, approaches that focus on respect for self, respect for others, and social-emotional growth lead to a productive peaceful classroom that contributes to academic progression. This poses the question: What can teachers do differently to obtain improved results? This text details the negative effects of the reward and punishment system and provides specific examples of what can be done differently to achieve desired results.

Abstract ID:24
Abstract Title:Associations between Body Mass Index, Gender, Grade and Food Choice among Middle Schoolers in Jasper County, SC
Student:.Monique Whitely (mwhitely@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Swati DebRoy (SDEBROY@uscb.edu)
Author List: Monique Whitely, Demetrius Rhodes, Kwesi Lincoln, Valerie Muehleman, Lydia Breland, Alan Warren, MPH, PhD, Swati Debroy, PhD
Program: Mathematics and Computational Science
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
Children with a high body mass index (BMI), an indicator of excess body weight, are more likely than their normal-weight counterparts to have insulin resistance, high blood pressure, asthma, depression, and poor self-esteem. In addition, obese children are more likely to become obese adults. The burden of obesity and related health conditions varies among different populations. It is more prevalent among minority groups, persons of lower socioeconomic status and residents of rural areas. For nearly a decade, BMI has been measured among elementary and middle school children in Jasper County, SC, and analyzed by race and gender. This effort has revealed an extremely high rate of obesity, prompting a research effort that resulted in a salad bar option being introduced to the existing lunch program at Hardeeville-Ridgeland Middle School for the 2016-17 academic year. Data are being collected on the frequency with which students opt for the salad bar option over traditional menu items. Additionally, students’ BMI, race, gender and socioeconomic status are recorded to enable the examination of associations of these personal attributes with salad bar usage. During the period of Sept 1, 2017, and Dec 9, 2017, the visits to the salad bar per day averaged 53.93 with a standard deviation of 18.9. A total of 333 unique students (out of 555) visited the salad bar at least once during this period, with the number of visits by a single person ranging from 1 to 37 (salad-bar served for 44 days in total). The overall goal of the project is to inform school wellness policy within a racially and socio-economically disadvantaged school district as a means of addressing health disparities.

Abstract ID:22
Abstract Title:Retrospective Analysis of a Hospital Evacuation: The Role of the Direct Care Staff
Student:.Tracey Yazvac (TYazvac@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Susan Williams (scwill@uscb.edu)
Author List: Tracey A. Yazvac RN, Susan Roos, DNP, MS, RN, NE-BC, and Susan C. Williams, PhD, RN
Program: Nursing and Health Professions
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
Emergency Management plans provide life safety measures required by regulatory entities such as The Joint Commission. Most facilities don’t have the opportunity to analyze the effectiveness of these plans when activated in an emergency rather than a simulation. Direct care nurses and nurse managers provide critical information that affects the safety and continuity of care for all patients. Key informants of a Progressive Care Unit of a 197 bed hospital in the Southeastern United States were interviewed related to their experience during Hurricane Matthew on October 9, 2017. We also interviewed the members of the Incident Management Executive Team (IMET) who implemented the evacuation. The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate the role and impact of clinical decisions made at the bedside on the Emergency Management Plan in a hospital wide evacuation. The results indicated that the direct care nurses were not aware how their clinical assessments would be used and how that would affect the disaster plan. The nurse manager, while aware of the overall scope of the plan, was using intuitive skills to gather information rather than a formatted plan. It was also determined that the IMET relied heavily on the information gathered by the direct care staff in their application of Disaster protocols. Based on this retrospective analysis, we recommend department specific training to all levels of staff on the scope and type of clinical assessment data needed during an evacuation.