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USCB Research and Scholarship Day

All Abstracts, sorted by program/department name (Total 67)

Abstract ID:29
Abstract Title:Damaging Rewards
Student:.London Walter (lwalter@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Elizabeth Brinkerhoff (EBRINKER@uscb.edu)
Author List: London I. Walter
Program: Education
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
In theory, the behaviorist method concerning reward and punishment seems to be an effective approach, but there are three detrimental effects: lack of morality development, lack of intrinsic motivation, and long term behaviors are not achieved. Nevertheless, the use of rewards and punishment still governs many classrooms. In contrast, approaches that focus on respect for self, respect for others, and social-emotional growth lead to a productive peaceful classroom that contributes to academic progression. This poses the question: What can teachers do differently to obtain improved results? This text details the negative effects of the reward and punishment system and provides specific examples of what can be done differently to achieve desired results.

Abstract ID:9
Abstract Title:Work in Progress
Student:.Adam Trawick (trawicka@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Ellen Malphrus (pemalphr@uscb.edu)
Author List: Adam Trawick
Program: English Theater and Liberal Studies
Abstract Category: Oral Presentations

Abstract:
I will be reading an excerpt from my creative senior thesis which, hopefully, will evolve into a novel. The story follows three friends sailing back from a few days out at sea; they decide to anchor down in middle of Cape Hatteras/Ocracoke Harbor, off the North Carolina coast, and spend one more night on the water before heading inland --before heading home. Through a series of conversations and revelations, and as the narrative switches from omniscient to individual perspective, weaving in and out of each character's mind, unifying sentiments are unveiled: a like-mindedness arises from these otherwise vastly different characters: a search for lost fathers, a search for companionship and guidance, and a search for belonging in a world where they are told all things are essentially connected, interlocked, and yet, paradoxically, they are living in the most isolating of times. A trinity is formed through the narrative: mind, body, and soul --and in one catastrophic instant, everything thought, done, and said on this fateful outing culminates, and then cracks. The fate of these three characters spills out into infinity. Interconnectivity, discovery, creation, youth, and loss are the major focuses here: do we discover things, or merely create them. Are we creatures or are we creators? An exploration of humanness, a probing into the nature of communication and thought: how much can we access and communicate? With love? With compassion? With empathy? How much is actually discovered, and how much is simply made up? Do things inherently make sense, or do we just render them somewhat sensible?

Abstract ID:15
Abstract Title:Stumbling in and Crawling Out the Rabbit Hole
Student:.Kaitlyn Trent (ktrent@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Ellen Malphrus (pemalphr@uscb.edu)
Author List: Kaitlyn Trent
Program: English Theater and Liberal Studies
Abstract Category: Oral Presentations

Abstract:
A collection of poetry that focuses on the effects of depression within the protagonist, and her struggle to overcome it.

Abstract ID:30
Abstract Title:Year of Bone
Student:.Alexis Henderson (alexish@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Ellen Malphrus (pemalphr@uscb.edu)
Author List: Alexis Henderson
Program: English Theater and Liberal Studies
Abstract Category: Oral Presentations

Abstract:
For as long as Immanuel Moore has been alive, she’s obeyed the sacred laws of her Lord and prophet. She says her prayers before she goes to bed, she pays her tithes to the church, and she shuns the evils that lurk in the woods. But when she discovers a diary left by her dead mother warning of a Satanic curse in the form of six plagues that will blight the only home she’s ever known, Immanuel is willing to break every creed and law in order to stop it. After a terrifying encounter with a supernatural being in the darkness of the wood, known only as “the Beast,” Immanuel joins forces with the prophet’s youngest son and heir, Ezra, whose clairvoyant power helps her on her quest to put an end to the demonic plagues and save her home before it’s destroyed. But as Immanuel’s quest to end the curse deepens—and her involvement with the woods and the beasts that live in it is questioned by members of the church—her allegiance to all that she’s known and believed in is put to the test and she begins to wonder if the cost of defeating the beasts is becoming one herself.

Abstract ID:31
Abstract Title:Religious Revisions: A Biblical Examination of Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass
Student:.Jacob Woelke (woelkej@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Mollie Barnes (mbarnes2@uscb.edu)
Author List: Jacob Woelke
Program: English Theater and Liberal Studies
Abstract Category: Oral Presentations

Abstract:
Walt Whitman, who in a letter to Emerson proclaimed himself to be a “man who has perfect faith,” christened his magnum opus, Leaves of Grass, as the “Bible of the New Religion” (qtd. in Harris 172). By characterizing both himself and his poetry in such an ecclesiastical manner, it seems as if Whitman unabashedly invites his readers to investigate his religiosity and the overtones of piety in Leaves of Grass. In fact, in my own close reading of this text (and taking his claims to faith seriously) I have found several moments within that retain biblical influence. These small tastes of spirituality within have sparked a curiosity within me regarding the spiritual workings of Whitman’s piece and have served to necessitate a more thorough religious examination of the text. More specifically, though, I am interested in examining the following questions: In what ways is Whitman revising (or not revising) the Judeo-Christian Bible, and to what end? And how do these revisions speak or respond to existing criticism? And who (readers? scholars? Whitman?) has the final say as to what the ultimate interpretation of the religion within the text is?

Abstract ID:59
Abstract Title:Executive Order 9066; Executive Order 13769: Fear and Wartime Legislation
Student:.Lauren White (whitelh00@gmail.com)
Faculty Mentor:.Erin McCoy (emccoy@uscb.edu)
Author List: Lauren White (Dr.James advised me!)
Program: English Theater and Liberal Studies
Abstract Category: Descriptive

Abstract:
This poster analyzes Japanese internment during World War II and the Supreme Court case Korematsu v. United States. It concludes that the Supreme Court’s failure to strike down legislation motivated by irrational fear as unconstitutional has lessons for our own time. Specifically the recent executive travel ban on Muslims has many similarities with FDR’s executive order 9066 that ordered the internment of all Japanese Americans on the west coast. Both executive orders highlight an abuse of power and unconstitutional liberty restriction in times of conflict. This poster proposes a review of war and policy to prevent further injustice.

Abstract ID:63
Abstract Title:Alphas and Omegas
Student:.Jake Woelke (jacobwoeke@gmail.com)
Faculty Mentor:.Ellen Malphrus (pemalphr@uscb.edu)
Author List: Jacob Woelke
Program: English Theater and Liberal Studies
Abstract Category: Oral Presentations

Abstract:
Alphas and Omegas is a collection of short stories in which I explore the dichotomies, dualities, parallels, and oppositions of the concepts of Beginnings and Ends. Each piece, in a different manner, brings a new perspective to the several divergent aspects of the contrasting Beginnings and Ends. It begins with "Crow's Oak," an excerpt from a larger piece, which sets the tone beautifully, introducing a nostalgic place where these two concepts meet in a small Southern town, and soon moves into other pieces such as "The Revelation," a piece about a mother who desperately seeks out baptism for her child, "The Butterfly," in which a daughter searches for something lost, and several other stories that engage with Alphas and Omegas, Lives and Deaths, Beginnings and Ends.

Abstract ID:67
Abstract Title:Disintegration
Student:.Zoe Slingluff (zoe@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Ellen Malphrus (pemalphr@uscb.edu)
Author List: Zoe Slingluff
Program: English Theater and Liberal Studies
Abstract Category: Oral Presentations

Abstract:
The student will be presenting an excerpt from her short story collection produced for Dr. Ellen Malphrus' creative senior thesis class.

Abstract ID:68
Abstract Title:Rhetorical Analysis of Pharmaceutical Advertisements
Student:.Savannah Sheppard (crewssl@usca.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Sarah Swofford (SWOFFORD@uscb.edu)
Author List: Savannah Sheppard
Program: English Theater and Liberal Studies
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
The reality of modern society now includes the existence of direct-to-consumer advertising specifically within the realm of pharmaceutical companies. Through my research I sought to deconstruct three separate pharmaceutical advertisements specifically targeted towards those with depression and their care-givers. Along with original analysis, I conducted a brief survey of my Facebook community, and also included secondary research that was pertinent to my argument. In conclusion I found that the pharmaceutical companies who publicize these advertisements, whilst appearing ignorant, heavily rely on the use of rhetorical appeals.

Abstract ID:69
Abstract Title:Pulling Back the Curtain: A Case for a Transparent, University-Wide Writing Community
Student:.Hayley Edwards (hayleye@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Sarah Swofford (SWOFFORD@uscb.edu)
Author List: Hayley Edwards
Program: English Theater and Liberal Studies
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
This project seeks to explore the problem of student writing and the difficulty students have with transferring knowledge from first-year composition courses (FYC) to other contexts and disciplines within the university. Through secondary research, personal experience, and a survey of faculty at USCB, I conclude that one way to remedy difficulties with transfer and enhance student writing abilities is to address writing holistically on a university-wide scale. In this thesis I describe the ways in which perceptions, expectations, and practices of writing within the university are currently fragmented, and I then explain the necessity of universities moving towards a cohesive writing community with common goals and understandings about writing. I then explore ways in which this writing community can be achieved through collaboration between FYC professors, non-English faculty, and the Writing Center, as well as the implications of this type of model.

Abstract ID:20
Abstract Title:Making of ``Jellyball'' animation
Student:.James Cheatham (cheathj@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Topher Maraffi (cmaraffi@uscb.edu)
Author List: James Cheatham
Program: Fine Arts
Abstract Category: Visual Arts

Abstract:
This poster shows the making of the short animation Jellyball, created for MART B310 Digital Animation 2. I wanted to produce an animation that fit the mood of the music and video games that I enjoy in my free time with my love of basketball. Using a minimalist style, in Blender 3D software I created pre-production designs, modeled, rigged and animated several characters, and added sound effects in post-production.

Abstract ID:26
Abstract Title:Visual Branding for USCB's Film & Digital Media Symposium
Student:.Samantha Clark (srclark@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Topher Maraffi (cmaraffi@uscb.edu)
Author List: Samantha Clark, Shaquiella Holmes, Abbey Long, and Eva Zygmuntowicz
Program: Fine Arts
Abstract Category: Visual Arts

Abstract:
This poster shows research that students in Graphic Design 1 did to visually brand USCB's Film and Digital Media Symposium. We illustrated movie and Beaufort themed posters in Adobe Photoshop, designed vector based logos in Illustrator, and modeled 3D motion graphics in Blender. These graphic and branding elements are being used in a final project website design developed in Dreamweaver.

Abstract ID:33
Abstract Title:USCB 3D Golf 2.0 Video Game Level Design
Student:.Brian Bartholf (bsb@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Topher Maraffi (cmaraffi@uscb.edu)
Author List: Brian Bartholf, Joey Roberts, Nicholas Bell
Program: Fine Arts
Abstract Category: Visual Arts

Abstract:
This poster shows continued development for MART B281/381 Video Game Design 1 & 2 USCB 3D Golf Game. We applied the MDA design framework to create interesting levels using the game engine Unity. We used player-centric visual design by first creating unique aesthetics of how the player will experience each level. Some levels require aesthetics that promote curiosity and exploration, while other levels promote active avoidance of dangers. Then we designed specific interaction events that will generate the desired experience, such as challenges that affect player health, navigation, or perception. Lastly, we developed mechanics and operational logics that supported the desired game play. One level employs a switching environments mechanic, while one provides a navigation system for finding key golf items, and another creates a golf assault in a flying Beaufort arsenal where you must avoid being wounded or falling off the island.

Abstract ID:34
Abstract Title:Visual Effects for an SCETV Climate Change Documentary
Student:.Michael J Roberts (mjr5@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Topher Maraffi (cmaraffi@uscb.edu)
Author List: Joey Roberts, Bradley Stanley, Kristen Cyrilla, Brian Bartholf
Program: Fine Arts
Abstract Category: Visual Arts

Abstract:
This poster shows how we created motion graphics to visualize the flooding effects of predicted sea level rise for the South Carolina Educational Television documentary, Climate Change: A Local Focus. Our MART B250 Broadcast Design 1 project involved separating photos of Lowcountry monuments into layers so we could composite floodwaters into the scene, and then animate the layers to create a 2.5D parallax visual effect. We also used Google Earth to show how places like downtown Beaufort and Charleston would look with six meters of sea level rise, and edited the animation elements into a video segment to be used in the documentary.

Abstract ID:35
Abstract Title:The Making of “Goal?” Animation
Student:.Nicholas Bell (nrbell@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Topher Maraffi (cmaraffi@uscb.edu)
Author List: Nicholas Bell
Program: Fine Arts
Abstract Category: Visual Arts

Abstract:
In MART B310 (Digital Animation 2) my project used blender, an animation software to create the illusion of life in 3D digital characters. My characters are a box, flour sack and a humanoid figure. The poster displays research about the principles of animation. I created a narrative about a box character who attempts to kick a ball into a soccer goal. I texture mapped objects such as a plane for the soccer field, a sphere for the soccer ball and the characters. The biggest challenge in texture mapping was creating a panoramic background. After developing my characters and the setting, I set key frames to place my characters and objects where ever I needed them to be. The last couple of steps are placing sounds in my animation and making test renders. After many hours of development and editing, the project was rendered into a final QuickTime movie.

Abstract ID:37
Abstract Title:Designing a Documentary Segment for SCETV’s Palmetto Scene
Student:.Bradley Stanley (bstanley@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Topher Maraffi (cmaraffi@uscb.edu)
Author List: Joey Roberts, Bradley Stanley
Program: Fine Arts
Abstract Category: Visual Arts

Abstract:
This poster shows a real-world broadcast design and documentary project done as part of our South Carolina Educational Television student internship. Our project, in partnership with SCETV aims to spotlight the Beaufort International Film Festival(BIFF) and the USCB Film and Digital Media Symposium which is new to the festival this year. Learning the production process, we went through pre-production planning , production and post-production editing. With the help of SCETV industry experienced faculty, we learned how to plan for the event, properly frame video shots using different techniques, capturing audio and lighting a scene, interviewing festival goers, and editing footage to create a cohesive story. Also, we applied post-production graphics techniques learned in our Broadcast Design 1 MART 250 class such as lower thirds and customized transitions. The goal of our project is to inform South Carolinians on the happenings in the Lowcountry in a visually appealing, interesting video segment while adhering to SCETV’s broadcast quality standards.

Abstract ID:41
Abstract Title:Music and Dance in Disney animations
Student:.Bradley Lamb (Btlamb@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Topher Maraffi (cmaraffi@uscb.edu)
Author List: Bradley Lamb
Program: Fine Arts
Abstract Category: Descriptive

Abstract:
This poster discusses the impact that music and dance had on the animation industry, focusing on Walt Disney’s contribution. The research questions I address in this poster are: when music had entered animation? what effects did music and dance have on story and character progression? and how did all this impact the audience? The reference material for this research poster was obtained online, using scholarly databases, and from print sources.

Abstract ID:45
Abstract Title:Exploring Cubist Concepts using Digital and Physical Media
Student:.Clarissa Jane Ibarra (cibarra@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Topher Maraffi (cmaraffi@uscb.edu)
Author List: Samantha Clark, Itzel Guedea, Clarissa Ibarra, Bradley Lamb, Jones Miller, Bryant Vandross, Eva Zygmuntowicz
Program: Fine Arts
Abstract Category: Visual Arts

Abstract:
This poster shows Digital Imaging course projects that explore Cubist concepts of perception inspired by the techniques of David Hockney. In our first project we used Hockney’s “joiner” method as a starting point to explore motion using 2D and 3D software. Our practice involved unwrapping textures in Blender animation software, and compressing frames of motion into one composite image in Adobe Photoshop. We then created digital prints enhanced with physical media and collage, creating hybrid aesthetics. Then we mapped our mixed-media collages back into our Blender projects to animate the results, bringing our 2D prints to life. As a final project, we imported our 3D environments into Unity game engine, and used coding to make interactive “joiners”, which we captured to prints.

Abstract ID:65
Abstract Title:Perceptions of Tourism in the Lowcountry: A case study of Beaufort County, South Carolina
Student:.Nicole Hinnant (nhinnant@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Nancy Hritz (NHRITZ@uscb.edu)
Author List: Nicole Hinnant, Dr. Nancy Hritz, Associate Professor, Dr. John Salazar, Professor, Dipl.-Soz. Anton AbrahamResearch Associate
Program: Hospitality Management
Abstract Category: Descriptive

Abstract:
Abstract Resident perceptions of tourism are important for economic growth and development of an area. It is important to obtain acceptance from local citizens within a community and ensure that future developments meet their needs without compromising plans of generations to come. To sustain tourism within an area “a positive approach intending to reduce tensions and frictions created by the complexity of interactions between tourism industry, tourist, natural environment and the local communities” (Dumbraveanu, 2016, p. 78) must be implemented. One way to ensure that we meet the needs of the local community is to gauge resident’s opinion of the current state of tourism in their community and welcome suggestions to shape its future. A trained team of research assistants with the Lowcountry and Resort Islands Tourism Institute conducted telephone surveys during the summer of 2016 using a database of all registered voters in Beaufort County. A total of 3859 calls were made with 554 willing participants and completed responses over the data collection period. This yielded a response rate of 14.3%. The survey asked basic demographic questions such as age, gender, income level, ethnicity, and marital status. In addition, the resident was asked about their perceptions of the economic, environmental and social/cultural impacts tourism has on their community. The results indicate that residents do support tourism in the area. Furthermore, they are most likely to support it if they feel a benefit themselves as was revealed in a regression model. Community and cultural benefits explained most of the variance in the model. These were aspects of tourism that lead to additional cultural attractions for residents such as festivals and theatrical performances. Furthermore, residents appreciate that tourism has attributed to a greater number of restaurants, activities and other attractions that they can also enjoy.

Abstract ID:38
Abstract Title:The Delayed Implementation of Brown v. Board of Education
Student:.Logan McFee (lmcfee@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Mac James (tjames@uscb.edu)
Author List: Logan McFee
Program: Humanities
Abstract Category: Descriptive

Abstract:
Brown v. Board of Education was a landmark case in which the United States could have achieved complete racial equality. The decision of the case, which was handed down on May 17, 1954, struck down the “separate but equal” clause that had been the courts’ precedent for almost 60 years. The decision could have ended segregation in schools in one day, and ideologically, it did. However, the physical reality of the deep south would quickly become a turbulent and volatile area. This presentation will look at some of the ways in which the Brown v. Board of Education was delayed, blocked, and protested.

Abstract ID:47
Abstract Title:Miranda V. Arizona in Historical Context
Student:.Theodora Huszagh (Thuszagh@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Mac James (tjames@uscb.edu)
Author List: Theodora Huszagh, Mac James
Program: Humanities
Abstract Category: Descriptive

Abstract:
The judicial precedent established by the Supreme Court in its landmark decision <i>Miranda V. Arizona</i> endures today. The procedural safeguards established by this case for the protection of the accused -known commonly as Miranda rights— remain widely regarded as some of the most important granted to criminal defendants. Miranda rights are pervasive through popular culture from cop shows on television, to songs on the radio, and in the fifty years following the decision, few rights guaranteed to Americans in criminal proceedings enjoy such universal recognition among the general public. But who was Ernesto Miranda and how did his case go all the way to the Supreme Court? This poster puts this famous Supreme Court case in the context of its time and place.

Abstract ID:48
Abstract Title:La Isla and Latin Music Festival Experience
Student:.Connor Anderson (csa2@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Lukasz Pawelek (LPAWELEK@uscb.edu)
Author List: Connor Anderson
Program: Humanities
Abstract Category: Descriptive

Abstract:
Hospitality major has prepared me to work and be around people in a festival environment. My Spanish major facilitated communicative and logistics aspects during this experience. Being able to communicate with bi-lingual speakers of Spanish and English allowed me to establish stronger level of connections while hospitality education has prepared me to apply my knowledge in the co-organization of the 2016 Latin Music Fest. In this presentation I will discuss my real life experience, Latino Community and its Growing Consumer Culture in the Low Country. Within this context, I will discuss the implementation of Hospitality and Spanish education which helped me apply classroom knowledge into the real world experience. The presentation will consist of a virtual poster (Prezi Online Presentation) and will feature data from 2013 census.

Abstract ID:51
Abstract Title:Ex Parte McCardle
Student:.cody solders (csolders@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Mac James (tjames@uscb.edu)
Author List: Cody Solders
Program: Humanities
Abstract Category: Descriptive

Abstract:
Historical interpretations of Supreme Court cases change overtime. This is certainly the case for the Supreme Court's landmark 1869 decision in Ex Parte McCardle. This poster will present two contrasting views from Kutler’s Ex Parte McCardle to Sever’s The McCardle Case, and will analyze their supporting evidence.

Abstract ID:60
Abstract Title:Cooper v. Aaron (1958): The Supreme Court’s Declaration of Power
Student:.Destiny Rose (destinyr@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Mac James (tjames@uscb.edu)
Author List: Destiny Rose
Program: Humanities
Abstract Category: Descriptive

Abstract:
This project involves discovering how the important Supreme Court case Cooper v. Aaron (1958)has changed over time. Through this case, the Supreme Court set the legal precedent that every state has to comply with the Supreme Court’s ruling even if they don’t agree with the decision. The case still remains important today as a symbol of judicial power.

Abstract ID:1
Abstract Title:Impact of a waning vaccine and altered behavior on the spread of influenza
Student:.Sarah Tobin (stobin@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Kasia Pawelek (kpawelek@uscb.edu)
Author List: Sarah Tobin, Kasia Pawelek, Dominik Ochocinski, Elissa J. Schwartz, and Sara Del Valle
Program: Mathematics and Computational Science
Abstract Category: Hypothesis Driven

Abstract:
Influenza remains one of the major infectious diseases that targets humankind. Understanding within-host dynamics of the virus and how it translates into the spread of the disease at a population level can help us obtain more accurate disease outbreak predictions. We created an ordinary differential equation model with parameter estimates based on the disease symptoms score data to determine various disease stages and parameters associated with infectiousness and disease progression. Having various stages with different intensities of symptoms enables us to incorporate spontaneous behavior change due to the onset/offset of disease symptoms. Additionally, we incorporate the effect of a waning vaccine on delaying the time and decreasing the size of an epidemic peak. Our results showed that the epidemic peak in the model was significantly lowered when public vaccination was performed up to two months past the onset of an epidemic. Also, behavior change in the earliest stages of the epidemic lowers and delays the epidemic peak. This study further provides information on pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical interventions during an influenza epidemic.

Abstract ID:2
Abstract Title:Effect of an imperfect vaccine and behavior change due to the symptoms on the spread of influenza
Student:.Christopher Griffin (cg5@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Kasia Pawelek (kpawelek@uscb.edu)
Author List: Christopher Griffin, Kasia A. Pawelek, Sarah Tobin, and Sara Del Valle
Program: Mathematics and Computational Science
Abstract Category: Hypothesis Driven

Abstract:
The influenza virus is classified as a major public health issue by the World Health Organization and Centers for Disease Control. Many individuals are vaccinated annually in the hopes of avoiding the influenza virus. However, some of these individuals are unaware that the vaccine efficacy is never 100% and that protection is acquired approximately two weeks following immunization. Understanding the effects of this misconception and connecting it to behavior change allows for improved predictions of an influenza epidemic. We used an ordinary differential equations model that accounts for behavior change and lack thereof upon receiving an imperfect influenza vaccine. Our model includes four stages of infectiousness that are proportional to the duration, severity, and viral shedding. Our model showed that when more than 75% of the vaccinated population is exposed to the influenza virus due to the failure of the vaccine to protect them against the infection, the epidemiological peak is higher and earlier than if the vaccine was not administered. The highest epidemiological peak resulted when the fraction of vaccinated individuals exposed to the influenza virus was 100%, i.e., when the vaccine completely failed and vaccinated individuals thought that they were protected again influenza virus. Our model also showed that incorporating behavior change in addition to vaccination also significantly lowers and delays the epidemiological peak giving more time to develop control and prevention strategies. This study further shows that behavior change is still necessary during an influenza outbreak even when a given individual is vaccinated. Because of the misconception that influenza vaccines are 100% effective and protection begins immediately, it is likely that some individuals will not change their behavior and contract the influenza virus, leading to an even higher magnitude epidemic.

Abstract ID:8
Abstract Title:An Educational Intervention to Promote Healthy-lifestyle choices among Middle Schoolers in Jasper County, SC
Student:.Madison Johnson (mej4@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Swati DebRoy (SDEBROY@uscb.edu)
Author List: Madison Johnson, Monique Whitely, Valerie Muehleman, Lydia Breland, Swati Debroy, PhD, Alan Warren, MPH, PhD
Program: Mathematics and Computational Science
Abstract Category: Descriptive

Abstract:
A salad bar option has been introduced for the first time to the existing lunch program at Hardeeville-Ridgeland Middle School in Jasper County, SC. Data are being collected on the frequency with which students opt for the salad bar option over traditional menu items. Additionally, students’ BMI, race, gender and socioeconomic status are recorded to enable the examination of associations of these personal attributes with salad bar usage. An integral part of this research effort is the design and implementation of an educational intervention program focused on eating healthy and being active. This program was implemented in the middle of the academic year, allowing an analysis of salad bar usage pre- and post-educational campaign. The educational campaign was delivered passively with informational posters in the cafeteria, and actively, through a 30-minute presentation in every classroom by undergraduate and medical school students. Key concepts of the educational program delivered via a video and slide presentation included: 1) the nationally recognized 5-2-1-0 childhood obesity prevention program 2) the importance of eating breakfast; 3) MyPlate with 3-dimensional food models to demonstrate appropriate portion sizes. To reinforce these concepts, a Bingo game on nutrition with prizes to incentive participation was also played. This research will allow the determination of the effectiveness of the content and delivery of the educational campaign and also its usefulness beyond the one Middle school that was treated.

Abstract ID:19
Abstract Title:USCB Events and Activities Management System
Student:.Benjamin Lipscomb (lipscobm@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Yiming Ji (yimingji@uscb.edu)
Author List: Benjamin Lipscomb, Brock Pivirotto, Jonathan Dayton, Peter Mize, Stacey Fernandez, Jesus PunLay, Colin Placke, Mitchell Tyner, Ashley Fernandez
Program: Mathematics and Computational Science
Abstract Category: Innovation Application

Abstract:
The USCB Events and Activities Management System is a web based application that keeps track of all of the current events, activities, and clubs that are happening around campus. This management system is the product of the software development process designed by students in the Spring 2017 Software Testing and Verification course. We all know being a college student isn’t easy, it can get busy and it can be easy to forget to take a break from that essay to take advantage and enjoy all the fun and free things to do on your campus. The purpose of this application is to promote campus events, increase attendance, and ease preparation for those hosting them. To accomplish this registered users are able to interact with the application to mark as attending, for those hosting gaining insight as to how many they should prepare for. Students may also sign-up for optional text message reminders, by receiving a text message the day of and not forgetting when and where the event is you wanted to attend. Users will be able to submit and post events to the application for others to see and attend, making it even easier to get the word out about what you have planned. Administrator accounts are created to approve student submitted events. This management system is limited to serving current USCB Students, but may include non-students in future releases of the software.

Abstract ID:23
Abstract Title:Impacts of Leishmaniasis
Student:.Kyana Grimball (Kyana@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Swati DebRoy (SDEBROY@uscb.edu)
Author List: Kyana Grimball
Program: Mathematics and Computational Science
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
Leishmaniasis Leishmaniasis remains a parasitic disease that is found in parts of the tropics, subtropics, and Southern Europe. It's importance is classified as a Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD). Leishmaniasis is caused by infection with protozoan Leishmania parasites, which are spread by the bite of phlebotomine sand flies. There are three main forms in which the most common forms are cutaneous leishmaniasis, which causes skin sores, and visceral leishmaniasis, which affects several internal organs (usually spleen, liver, and boas ne marrow). Attention to this disease is overdue as the World Health Organization (WHO) conveys an estimated 900 000–1.3 million new cases and 20 000 to 30 000 deaths occur annually. VL can be found in many areas of the world including India, Central and South America, the Mediterranean, Africa, Asia, the Middle East, China, and the Caribbean. . Risk factors include poverty, malnutrition, deforestation, and urbanization. In this review we propose to utilize [particular mathematical model] in order to estimate [the infection rate, cure, etc…]

Abstract ID:24
Abstract Title:Associations between Body Mass Index, Gender, Grade and Food Choice among Middle Schoolers in Jasper County, SC
Student:.Monique Whitely (mwhitely@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Swati DebRoy (SDEBROY@uscb.edu)
Author List: Monique Whitely, Demetrius Rhodes, Kwesi Lincoln, Valerie Muehleman, Lydia Breland, Alan Warren, MPH, PhD, Swati Debroy, PhD
Program: Mathematics and Computational Science
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
Children with a high body mass index (BMI), an indicator of excess body weight, are more likely than their normal-weight counterparts to have insulin resistance, high blood pressure, asthma, depression, and poor self-esteem. In addition, obese children are more likely to become obese adults. The burden of obesity and related health conditions varies among different populations. It is more prevalent among minority groups, persons of lower socioeconomic status and residents of rural areas. For nearly a decade, BMI has been measured among elementary and middle school children in Jasper County, SC, and analyzed by race and gender. This effort has revealed an extremely high rate of obesity, prompting a research effort that resulted in a salad bar option being introduced to the existing lunch program at Hardeeville-Ridgeland Middle School for the 2016-17 academic year. Data are being collected on the frequency with which students opt for the salad bar option over traditional menu items. Additionally, students’ BMI, race, gender and socioeconomic status are recorded to enable the examination of associations of these personal attributes with salad bar usage. During the period of Sept 1, 2017, and Dec 9, 2017, the visits to the salad bar per day averaged 53.93 with a standard deviation of 18.9. A total of 333 unique students (out of 555) visited the salad bar at least once during this period, with the number of visits by a single person ranging from 1 to 37 (salad-bar served for 44 days in total). The overall goal of the project is to inform school wellness policy within a racially and socio-economically disadvantaged school district as a means of addressing health disparities.

Abstract ID:25
Abstract Title:GymStat
Student:.Benjamin Craven (cravenbr@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Brian Canada (bcanada@uscb.edu)
Author List: Benjamin Craven, Osias Lozano, Ashton Purvis, Alexis Hargett, Conner Appel, Demetrius Rhodes, Phillip Gardiner, Stephen Vinciguerra, WesleyPatti
Program: Mathematics and Computational Science
Abstract Category: Innovation Application

Abstract:
Our team has developed GymStat, which is a system that will assist students in managing their time efficiently when going to the gym. The major problem we have been presented with is determining what the current occupancy of them gym is at any given time, and what the maximum capacity is. To deal with this problem we are developing a database that gym staff will alter using our admin webpage. The data will be processed, and then displayed through our mobile app for the students to view. The webpage portion of our system will alter the current count of patrons in the gym, as well as act as a check-in system for coaches who want to use the gym at certain hours as a group workout for their athletes. Only users with administrative rights (gym staff & coaches) will be allowed to login to the webpage. The mobile application portion of our system will be a fairly simple set up. It will only receive data, as it is acting solely to provide information to the student. It will pull information from the database and display current occupancy and peak hours throughout the day.

Abstract ID:50
Abstract Title:"To Settle is to Conquer" - Incorporating Santa Elena's History into Gaming Design as Tangential Learning Facilitator: Application of Java and Greenfoot
Student:.Krzysztof Lipski (klipski@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Brian Canada (bcanada@uscb.edu)
Author List: Krzysztof Lipski, Brian Canada PhD - final co-author
Program: Mathematics and Computational Science
Abstract Category: Innovation Application

Abstract:
To Settle is to Conquer “To Settle is to Conquer” is an adventurous game that tests your skills of command of a Spanish ship that sets sail from the port of Cadiz, Spain on June 27th, 1565 on the challenging trans-oceanic voyage that will take you to the mouth of the St. John’s River, Florida. The game is based on notable historical events that occurred in 16th century, when France and Spain were in a race to be the first to either secure or destroy the France’s Fort Caroline. France’s top admiral, Jean Ribault, led the French armada on a mission of reinforcing Fort Caroline, while Spain’s top military leader, Pedro Menendez de Aviles was determined to prevent him from doing it. Therefore, both men felt urgency of this race to defend their nation’s interests. The race to Fort Caroline was one of historical significance. It is due to the fact that the winner would determine who controlled La Florida. “To Settle is to Conquer” is a two-dimensional game in which you guide your ship through the dangers of the Atlantic Ocean to arrive safely in the mouth of the St. John’s River near Fort Caroline. The player controls an in-game ship by moving it vertically and horizontally across the screen by using control keys and competes against computer-controlled opponent. The aim of the player is to reach the Fort Caroline’s harbor before the opponent while avoiding obstacles such as storms, hurricanes, and pirates. This game could be considered both educational and entertaining because it enables the learning of contents that the player may ask (historical background of the race), without taking the fun away. In other words, learning of historical context included within a game is not a demand but a spur for a potential player.

Abstract ID:52
Abstract Title:CMS-Based Web Design to Support Historical and Cultural Heritage Organizations in South Carolina
Student:.Ashley Fernandez (fernanae@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Brian Canada (bcanada@uscb.edu)
Author List: Ashley Fernandez, Keila Calderon, and Dr. Brian Canada
Program: Mathematics and Computational Science
Abstract Category: Innovation Application

Abstract:
Established in 1862 as a school for freed African-American slaves until 1948, Penn Center evolved over the years and served as a retreat for Martin Luther King Jr. in the 1960s. It is now a 501(c)(3) nonprofit primarily serving the interests of the Gullah community on St. Helena Island, South Carolina. The organization reached out to the web team from the USCB student chapter of ACM (Association for Computing Machinery) to construct a navigable online presence where contributions could be made effortlessly. ACM members incorporated custom programming code, user-interface design, and historical media while following principles of agile software development, including the identification of user stories as a guide for application design along with the adoption of “Kanban” task boards for project management. The team developed the site navigation and content using Squarespace, a CMS (Content Management System) growing in popularity due to its ease of use and integrated e-commerce capabilities. After development was complete, the new www.penncenter.com website launched in the summer of 2016. Following the release of this website, the Hilton Head Island-based Heritage Library Foundation (HLF) requested assistance from the ACM web team for its own website redesign effort, which is currently in progress as the ACM’s major project for the 2016-17 school year. The HLF provides resources for researchers involving the historical aspects of Hilton Head Island while serving as a library of family history, enabling its visitors to study their own family lineages. As with Penn Center’s refreshed web presence, the ACM web team elected to use the Squarespace CMS for the updated HLF website. While the migration of content from the original HLF website to Squarespace is still in progress, we are able to present a “sneak preview” of the forthcoming HLF website, targeted for completion by late spring 2017. In showcasing both the Penn Center and HLF websites here today, we hope to demonstrate that ACM represents a viable option for historical, cultural heritage, and other non-profit organizations looking to modernize and update their online presence in a cost-effective manner.

Abstract ID:53
Abstract Title:SIMMER Phase II: A Mobile-Friendly Web Application for Mastering Genetics Problems
Student:.Stacey Fernandez (fernansm@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Brian Canada (bcanada@uscb.edu)
Author List: Michelle Fernandez, Dr. Brian Canada
Program: Mathematics and Computational Science
Abstract Category: Innovation Application

Abstract:
A vast majority of web-based student study tools exhibit a "static" approach, allowing students to learn only the fundamentals of a subject. Due to the lack of diverse question parameters, the static approach often misleads students into believing they have mastered a topic, when they have actually only memorized answers to a limited amount of problems. In an attempt to help students gain an authentic understanding of a topic, SIMMER (Synthetic + Interactive + iMmersive = Mastery through Engagement + Reinforcement) has been created to accompany STEM courses. SIMMER is an "electronic recitation tool" that produces randomized parameters to create infinite problem variations. The ability to solve problems with changing parameters enables students to acquire genuine knowledge of a skill and to be better equipped for real-world applications, where problems may have variations and imperfections. A web-based prototype of SIMMER has been developed previously and has served as a useful study aid for students in the introductory genetics course at USCB (BIOL B303). In an effort to provide students with greater convenience and efficiency when using SIMMER, we have begun development of a mobile-friendly version of SIMMER, using the three-point mapping problem as a case study. Three-point mapping is an important concept in genetics as it accurately establishes the order and distance between three linked genes during the process of meiosis. Like previous iterations of SIMMER, our new prototype generates a virtually unlimited set of three-point mapping problems for students to practice solving, but its new mobile-friendly user interface is designed to enable students with the ability to solve problems “on the go” without the need for a computer, a separate calculator, or even a pencil and paper. These features enable the student to develop critical-thinking and problem-solving skills rather than memorizing how to solve a limited amount of problems.

Abstract ID:54
Abstract Title:Michelle and Pancake Animation: A 2D Computer Graphics Animation using OpenGL
Student:.Michelle Fernandez (fernansm48@gmail.com)
Faculty Mentor:.Xuwei Liang (xliang@uscb.edu)
Author List: Michelle Fernandez, Dr. Xuwei Liang
Program: Mathematics and Computational Science
Abstract Category: Innovation Application

Abstract:
The showcased animation is of my cat, Pancake, and myself. The program was implemented with C++ and OpenGl graphics library. The goal of this project was to practice 2D computer graphics primitives and transformations using OpenGl. The user interactions are implemented with GLUT, which is a free source computer graphics library functions for interactive input and 2D transformations. In the animation, Pancake and I play with a ball of yarn together while her tail waves. The user is able to change the color of my dress, the screen size, or choose to display the title. They can also decide to play or stop the animation by left or right clicking the mouse. Instructions for user interactions are shown in the standard output window.

Abstract ID:57
Abstract Title:Mathematical Model to Characterize Childhood Obesity in Schools
Student:.Demetrius Rhodes (drhodes@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Swati DebRoy (SDEBROY@uscb.edu)
Author List: Demetrius Rhodes, Swati DebRoy
Program: Mathematics and Computational Science
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
Nearly 1/3rd of children in the United States are classified overweight or obese. Children with a high body mass index (BMI), an indicator of excess body weight, are more likely than their normal weight counterparts to have insulin resistance, high blood pressure, asthma, depression and poor self-esteem. In addition, obese children are more likely to become obese adults. The burden of obesity and related health conditions varies among different populations. It is more prevalent among minority groups, persons of lower socioeconomic status and residents of rural areas. For nearly a decade, BMI has been measured among elementary and middle school children in Beaufort and Jasper County, SC, and analyzed by race, gender and socio-economic status. This effort has revealed an extremely high rate of obesity, prompting a research effort to understand different aspects of this epidemic and formulate effective interventions to revert the current trend. In this poster we apply a well-established SIR (susceptible-infected-recovered) differential equation model to childhood obesity data in schools of Beaufort and Jasper County, SC. Obesity has been interpreted as an infection where social influence to attain and maintain a weight status is viewed as an infection. The model is used to estimate infection parameters using the epidemiological data from the schools and quantify aspects of the obesity epidemic in the Low country. We also intend to characterize the prevalence of obesity in different schools based on their overall distribution of race and socio-economic status.

Abstract ID:66
Abstract Title:Revenge of the Incans
Student:.Diana Arencibia (dianaa@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Brian Canada (bcanada@uscb.edu)
Author List: Diana Arencibia
Program: Mathematics and Computational Science
Abstract Category: Innovation Application

Abstract:
Revenge of the Incans simulates the time period when the Spanish attacked and conquered the Incan’s. The object of the game is for the Incan to defeat the enemies that are in his way to getting to the end of the game, where the user will have to defeat the final boss. The characters for the game were inspired by the 2000 film, The Emperor’s New Groove. The Incan will be portrayed as Kusco, the conquistadors are Kronk, and the final boss, Francisco Pizzaro, is Yzma. The player will move across the screens using the directional keys, up, down, left, and right. The player will fight the enemies by pressing the spacebar to hit the enemy with a short knife. The final boss will also be defeated in the same manner and when Yzma is defeated a screen will show that the threat is gone and the Incan’s are safe.

Abstract ID:70
Abstract Title:Santa Elena: Planting the Seeds of the New World
Student:.Robert Currall (rcurrall@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Brian Canada (bcanada@uscb.edu)
Author List: Robert Currall
Program: Mathematics and Computational Science
Abstract Category: Innovation Application

Abstract:
The topic of this game covers life in Santa Elena, the player will attempt to make the settlement profitable by bringing various craftsman over from Spain to work and live in the settlement. Santa Elena had many hardships that prevented it from flourishing as a colony, this game will immerse the player in the lifestyle of the time, giving them understanding of the struggles settlers faced on a day to day basis. Players should also walk away with a basic knowledge of the history of Santa Elena, and hopefully spark an interest in the history of the Spanish colonies in America. The player has an aerial view of the settlement that the he or she can move around on. The character can interact with different settlers through dialogue, this game is meant to be a real time strategy game, as the player attempts to increase the revenue of the settlement before the Spanish government decides the settlement is not profitable and orders its abandonment. The player will hire craftsmen from Spain to work in the settlement to increase their monthly revenue. If the player acquires 200,000 gold in the treasury before ten year pass in game (approximately twenty-three minutes) the player will win the game. If the player fails to obtain the necessary 200,000 gold before the ten year deadline the game will end with a game over screen, informing the player that the Spanish government did not think the settlement was profitable enough and was to be abandoned and burned to the ground. The objective of the game is similar to the objective of the men settling Santa Elena. The settlement was an investment in the new world and ultimately was not profitable so the Spanish government ordered Santa Elena to be abandoned ten years after it was established.

Abstract ID:10
Abstract Title:Assay Development of Phosphofructokinase-1 from Borrelia Burgdorferi
Student:.Ashley Freeman (afreeman@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Edward D`Antonio (edantonio@uscb.edu)
Author List: Ashley Freeman and Edward L. D'Antonio
Program: Natural Sciences
Abstract Category: Hypothesis Driven

Abstract:
Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness that contains a spirochete bacterium called Borrelia Burgdorferi. Lyme disease affects patients along the northern/mid-east coast regions of the United States. This disease can be transmitted to mammals, birds and humans by black-legged ticks that are infected by B. burgdorferi. Lyme disease is one of the most common borne illnesses in the United States with over 150,000 reported cases to the Center of Disease Control and Prevention since 1982. The B. burgdorferi spirochete uses the glycolytic pathway as an essential pathway for the energy production (ATP and NADH). B. burgdorferi phosphofructokinase-1 (BbPFK-1) is the drug target in the glycolytic pathway. PFK-1 is a regulatory enzyme that catalyzes fructose-6-phosphate and ATP to fructose-1,6-bisphosphate and ADP. By inhibiting BbPFK-1, the T. cruzi parasite will undergo apoptosis from the starvation of cellular energy. In order to determine effective compounds that will inhibit BbPFK-1, high-throughput screening (HTS) will eventually be used. The HTS study will screen 13,040 compounds against BbPFK-1. Our studies have focused on being able to miniaturize the assay that will be used for HTS future studies. This assay involves a 4-enzyme coupled system ((1) BbPFK-1, (2) aldolase, (3) triosephosphate isomerase, and (4) Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase). This project was recently awarded funding by the University of South Carolina Office of the Vice President for Research (Magellan Mini-Grant Program).

Abstract ID:13
Abstract Title:Expression, Purification, and Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Glucokinase
Student:.Emilee Conner (EC2@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Edward D`Antonio (edantonio@uscb.edu)
Author List: Emilee L. Conner, and Edward L. D’Antonio
Program: Natural Sciences
Abstract Category: Hypothesis Driven

Abstract:
Expression, Purification, and Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Glucokinase (SaGlcK) Emilee L. Conner and Edward L. D’Antonio, Ph.D. Department of Natural Sciences, University of South Carolina Beaufort, 1 University Boulevard, Bluffton, SC 29909 This project focused on the enzymology of Staphylococcus aureus glucokinase, SaGlcK. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the bacteria that can be found inside the nose and on the skin. The disease is spread through human-to-human contact. Community-associated MRSA happens to people who have close skin-to-skin contact with others, such as athletes involved in football and wrestling. Healthcare providers can pass on the germ, simply by treating a patient with the disease and touching another person, due to its highly contagious nature. An infected person can also spread the germ through everyday items they touch, such as bathroom fixtures, medical equipment, exercise equipment, and bed linens. The Staphylococcus aureus bacterium is resistant to most antibiotics, specifically beta-lactams. Many of the most widely used antibiotics such as penicillin, cephalosporin, and monobactams are beta-lactams. In most cases these antibiotics operate by inhibiting bacterial cell wall biosynthesis. In order to understand the resistance to current antibiotics, it was crucial to express and purify the enzyme and possible drug-target SaGlcK. After expression and purification of SaGlcK, kinetic assays were performed. Our overall goal was to determine kinetics for this enzyme and then develop inhibitors to target SaGlcK. Many experimental variables can affect enzyme activity; therefore, such factors were examined. For example, various concentrations of D-Glucose, ranges of pH, and kinetics time optima were tested and evaluated. The results concluded that a pH of 7.6, with a 30 mM concentration of D-glucose, incubated at 37 oC for three hours yielded the optimal kinetics response. This project has been awarded the Magellan Mini-Grant from the University of South Carolina to promote further research.

Abstract ID:14
Abstract Title:Synthesis and Purification of Trypanosoma cruzi Glucosamine Analogue Inhibitors
Student:.Scott Green (scottbg@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Edward D`Antonio (edantonio@uscb.edu)
Author List: Scott B. Green, Robert J. Lanier Jr., Edward L. D'Antonio Ph.D.
Program: Natural Sciences
Abstract Category: Hypothesis Driven

Abstract:
Synthesis and Purification of Trypanosoma cruzi Glucosamine Analogue Inhibitors Scott B. Green, Robert J. Lanier Jr, Edward L. D’Antonio Ph.D. Department of Natural Sciences, University of South Carolina Beaufort, 1 University Boulevard, Bluffton, SC 29909 Each year, 6-7 million people worldwide are affected by American Trypanosomiasis (Chagas’ disease), caused by the protozoan parasite T. cruzi. The disease is acquired after being bitten by an infected triatomine insect (kissing bug), and leads to lethal complications over a fifteen-year period. This is a neglected tropical disease that impacts many impoverished nations of Central and South America where medical treatment is either unavailable or grossly unaffordable. Medications available to combat Chagas’ disease are antiquated and cause intolerable side effects. These anti-parasitic drugs, benznidazole and nifurtimox, were developed more than 35 years ago. Side effects include, peripheral neuropathy, vomiting, nausea, and insomnia. Since their development, neither medication has been approved by a certifying agency within the United States due to high toxicity. There is an urgent need to develop alternative medicines and new approaches to combat this epidemic. Previous research has shown significant inhibition of glucokinase, a glycolytic enzyme drug-target present in the parasite T. cruzi. Utilizing structure-activity relationships (SAR), we have identified 21 potential candidate compounds that are proposed to bind into the active site of the enzyme which have a similarity to the effective TcGlcK inhibitor 2-benzamido-2-deoxy-D-glucopyranose. D-Glucosamine, D-mannosamine, and D-galactosamine are monosaccharide amines and isomers of the known glucose-based inhibitor found to be potent and selective with respect to the human version of the glucokinase enzyme. From the SAR approach, acyl chloride derivatives were synthesized by a hydrolysis reaction. Optimization, synthesis, and purification details will be presented. To date, 12 of the 21 candidate compounds are ready to move on to extensive analytical testing, including parasite in vitro studies.

Abstract ID:18
Abstract Title:Establishing a Relationship between Seasonal Patterns of Fish Sound Production and Young-of-the-Year Abundance in the May River and Chechessee Creek South Carolina
Student:.Bradshaw McKinney (mckinnb@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Eric Montie (emontie@uscb.edu)
Author List: Bradshaw McKinney*1; Claire Mueller1; Somers Smott1; Agnieszka Monczak1; Thomas Morgenstern1; Jamileh Soueidan1; Tony Mills2; Chris Marsh2; Eric Montie1 1Department of Natural Sciences, University of South Carolina Beaufort, Bluffton, SC 2The Lowcountry Institute, Okatie, SC
Program: Natural Sciences
Abstract Category: Hypothesis Driven

Abstract:
Atlantic croaker (Micropogonias undulatus), black drum (Pogonias cromis), red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus), silver perch (Bairdiella chrysoura), southern kingfish (Menticirrhus americanus), spot croaker (Leiostomus xanthurus), spotted sea trout (Cynoscion nebulosaus), and weakfish (Cynoscion regalis) are all fish that belong to the family Sciaenidae and inhabit the waters of North Carolina and South Carolina. Fish within this family produce sounds that are associated with courtship behavior and spawning. Thus, by listening to estuarine soundscapes, we can identify spawning aggregations. The goal of this study was to establish a connection between reproductive activity (as measured by sound production) and young-of-the-year (YOY) abundance. The data collected from DSG-Ocean acoustic recorders provide the exact dates of when spawning seasons begin and end, the duration of these seasons, and a general location of the spawning aggregation. From these data, intertidal creeks near each recording station were chosen and sampled bi-weekly using a haul seine during low tide. Juvenile fish abundance, total length, and biomass were collected throughout the sampling period. Atlantic croaker, black drum, red drum, silver perch, southern kingfish, spot croaker, and spotted seatrout were all collected near the DSG stations. Silver perch YOY were most abundant May through July, spotted seatrout YOY from August through October, and red drum YOY from October to December. The appearance of YOY in the estuary is approximately one month later than the spawning season predicted by the detection of courtship sounds. These patterns provide further support that passive acoustics can aid in monitoring reproductive output in an estuary.

Abstract ID:27
Abstract Title:Monitoring the Impacts of Climate Change in the Lowcountry of South Carolina – Sea Level Rise, Water Temperature, and Shifts in the Timing of Fish Reproduction
Student:.Joshua Himes (himesjr@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Eric Montie (emontie@uscb.edu)
Author List: Joshua Himes1, Jamileh Soueidan1, Ashlee Seder1, Agnieszka Monczak1, Claire Mueller1, Somers Smott1, Bradshaw McKinney1, Thomas Morgenstern1, Tony Mills2, Chris Marsh2, and Eric W. Montie1
Program: Natural Sciences
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
Climate change is rapidly impacting the world in which we live both above and below the water. It is important to closely monitor local ecosystems so that any impacts of climate change may be identified and addressed. Thus, the goal of this study is to investigate the impacts of climate change on the May River and Chechessee Creek ecosystems, specifically sea level rise, changes in estuarine temperatures, and shifts in the timing of seasonal events of marine organisms (i.e., phenological shifts). Autonomous loggers have been monitoring sea level rise and water temperature changes in the May River since 2013 and Chechessee Creek in 2016. In addition to the loggers, DSG-Ocean acoustic recorders have been collecting information on the estuarine soundscape, which helps estimate fish spawning timelines and other seasonal behaviors of marine life. The depth loggers were able to record the storm surge of Hurricane Matthew in October 2016 at three locations in the May River and two locations in Chechessee Creek. The water temperature loggers deployed in the May River showed a general increase in bottom temperature since their deployment in 2013 with a peak in 2016. A warmer spring in 2016 caused the spawning season of silver perch (Bairdiella chrysoura) to occur earlier, which could lead to phenological and/or trophic mismatches, affecting year class size. These data provide critical information regarding how sea level rise and storm surge associated with future tropical events may impact low lying coastal areas and how increasing water temperatures may affect estuarine ecosystems of the lowcountry.

Abstract ID:28
Abstract Title:Acoustic Propagation of Fish Calls in the May River, South Carolina
Student:.Shaneel Bivek (sbivek@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Eric Montie (emontie@uscb.edu)
Author List: Shaneel Bivek1; Austin Roller1; Agnieszka Monczak1; Claire Mueller1; Eric W. Montie1
Program: Natural Sciences
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
Many fish species produce courtship calls as part of their reproductive process. In estuaries of the Southeast United States, these include species belonging to the Family Batrachoididae such as the oyster toadfish (Opsanus tau) and species belonging to the Family Sciaenidae such as Atlantic croaker (Micropogonias undulatus), black drum (Pogonias cromis), silver perch (Bairdiella chrysoura), spotted sea trout (Cynoscion nebulosus), and red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus). These courtship calls propagate outward from the source and may attract males and females to a spawning location. The purpose of this study was to determine the propagation distance of fish calls for oyster toadfish, silver perch, spotted sea trout, and red drum using the cylindrical spreading loss model. We determined the transmission loss at various distances and then subtracted these losses from species-specific source sound pressure levels (SPLs) obtained from the scientific literature. When using the cylindrical spreading loss model, the results showed that the SPL of the call followed an exponential decay as the sounds moved away from the source for oyster toadfish, silver perch, spotted sea trout, and red drum. These data will help us to better understand the function of calling in the formation of spawning aggregations. In addition, it creates a model to better understand how noise pollution such as dredging, recreational boat traffic and shipping noise may affect fish acoustic communication.

Abstract ID:55
Abstract Title:Beneficial Microbes Associated with White Sharks and Tiger Sharks: Implications for wound-healing and drug discovery
Student:.Daniel Conrad (dconrad@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Kim Ritchie (kritch@uscb.edu)
Author List: Daniel Conrad, Aubree Denton, Michalee Ford, Danielle Young, Diego Agudelo Gil, Kim Ritchie
Program: Natural Sciences
Abstract Category: Descriptive

Abstract:
Members of the subclass Elasmobranchii are cartilaginous fish that include sharks, skates and rays. Elasmobranchs have an extraordinary ability to heal dermal wounds rapidly, although the mechanisms behind this phenomenon are unknown. The Ritchie lab is conducting studies to explore innate immunity and beneficial bacterial associations that may play a role in wound healing in sharks. Recent studies from this lab have focused on the isolation of novel antimicrobials from bacterial associates of ray and skate species. At USCB, our objectives are to survey bacteria associated with the epidermal surfaces of the white shark (Carcharodon carcharias) and tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier) in order to address 1) shark epidermal surface-derived antibiotic activities, 2) bacterial roles in this activity and 3) shark bacteria as a novel source of antibiotics. To date we have cultured and purified over 960 bacteria from two white sharks and two tiger sharks that were captured off of the coast of Hilton Head Island, SC, in March of 2017. Shark bacteria are undergoing screening for antibiotic potential against a panel of gram-positive and gram-negative test pathogens. Future work will include a) surveys to compare innate immunity across elasmobranchs, b) beneficial bacteria as a health proxy for tiger sharks of Port Royal Sound, and c) the first shark microbiome project.

Abstract ID:7
Abstract Title:Improving Nursing Communication Using Bedside Shift Report
Student:.Amanda Driggers (agillard@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Susan Williams (scwill@uscb.edu)
Author List: Amanda L Driggers, RN
Program: Nursing and Health Professions
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
Abstract In the current healthcare system, hospital funding is partially based on patient satisfaction. This is largely measured by patient responses on the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey. One of the survey’s areas of focus is Nursing Communication, which has been shown in previous published studies to improve with the implementation of nursing bedside shift report. Bedside shift report includes providing detailed information between nurses about the patient’s plan of care during each shift handoff. The purpose of this nursing research project is to implement consistent bedside shift report, and to determine whether this practice will result in improved Nursing Communication HCAHPS scores on an inpatient medical-surgical unit. Evidence-based research and expert analysis was consulted to formulate an implementation plan for this new practice. Nurses were informed of the decision and of its importance by their nurse manager via email, and discussion of the project was encouraged during a staff meeting and a shared governance meeting. After roll-out, patient rounding was conducted twice per week to gauge staff compliance, as well as patient perception of the practice. Results will be determined by HCAHPS scores, which will be examined each month to determine if nursing communication scores are gradually increasing. Baseline data for nursing communication HCAHPS scores on this unit is 66.7%, with a goal of 5% increase within three months. Consistent bedside shift report provides an environment in which the patient, as well as the nurse, can receive the information most vital for that shift, and therefore is expected to increase HCAHPS scores when practiced regularly.

Abstract ID:11
Abstract Title:The Impact of the Georgia Teens Ride with P.R.I.D.E Course on Teens and Parents in Chatham County Georgia
Student:.Rodriqua McQuire (rmcquire@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Lauren Gellar (lgellar@uscb.edu)
Author List: Rodriqua McQuire, Amanda Ramirez, RN, Stephanie Gendron, MPA, Dr. Diana Reindl, and Dr. Lauren Gellar
Program: Nursing and Health Professions
Abstract Category: Hypothesis Driven

Abstract:
ABSTRACT Background Distracted driving is the number one cause of teen motor vehicular crashes. Due to this, the state of Georgia implemented a program to increase knowledge of driving behaviors, Georgia driving laws, risk factors for distracted driving, and advice for parents to give their teens who are driving. This program is called Georgia Teens Ride with P.R.I.D.E (Parents Reducing Injuries and Driving Error). Methods The P.R.I.D.E. course is taught by two staff members from Memorial University Medical Center’s Trauma Services in Savannah, Georgia. This class is taught once a month at the Savannah-Chatham Police Training Center. Participants in the course range from 14 to 16 years of age along with their parents. Georgia’s Traffic Injury and Prevention Institute (GTIPI) developed a pre-test and post-test questionnaire to test the impact of the intervention on knowledge of safe driving. These tests were comprised of five questions based on Georgia’s driving laws which were provided in the material disseminated during the class. Results Of the thirty teens who participated in the class, there was an overall increase in knowledge from pre-test to post-test. The average increase in knowledge was about 30% from the start of the class until it concluded. Of the thirty-seven parents who participated in the class, there was an overall increase in knowledge as well from pre-test to post-test. The average increase in knowledge was about 23% from the start of the class until it concluded. Conclusion The Georgia Teen Ride with P.R.I.D.E course was effective in increasing knowledge about driving behaviors and laws to teens and their parents in the local communities. Evaluations of the program, completed by parents and teens, also show that P.R.I.D.E provided measurable increases in knowledge about safe driving practices, risk factors, and Georgia law.

Abstract ID:16
Abstract Title:Interdisciplinary Training for USCB Students Using Actor Simulation
Student:.Elizabeth White (eluther@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Lauren Gellar (lgellar@uscb.edu)
Author List: Elizabeth White, Kirsten Wartko
Program: Nursing and Health Professions
Abstract Category: Innovation Application

Abstract:
Background: This study utilized actor simulation as a pedagogical tool for training Health Promotions students in methods of gathering research. Students are encouraged to move beyond hypothetical engagement and apply the skills acquired in their respective fields during the simulation. Methods: The Theater program collaborated with the Health Promotions program to organize two separate training periods, also referred to as encounters. These qualitative focus groups were facilitated by Health Promotion students with Theatre students and their faculty serving as focus group participants. Each theatre student was asked to develop a character, a personality, a backstory and specific actions derived from their character’s social and cultural norms. The first encounter focused on responses to a hypothetical fitness curriculum initiative being tested in the public school system. This simulation necessitated actors take on two roles. First, the theatre students were told to act as the elementary students participating in the new fitness program and the HP students were to participate as the adults giving the survey. Then, theater students switched gears and were asked to then play the fitness educators required to administer the new curriculum. The second encounter focused more on the andragogy learning method by looking into the lives of a simulated adult members of the lesbian community.  Results: Our results consisted of the information gathered from each of the characters’ answers and their participation in the program. Students in the Health Promotions department were given the opportunity to conduct a focus group while maintaining a safe and controlled environment. Acting students were encouraged to apply the skills learned in class to the simulation as a means of enhancing a collective learning experience. 1   Lessons Learned: Overall, these training sessions were very effective in assisting USCB students learn how to facilitate focus groups and complete Actor Ensemble Simulation. It is highly recommended that other USCB departments consider utilizing actor simulations as a means of training students.

Abstract ID:17
Abstract Title:Smoking Cessation Program for Family Practice
Student:.Yuliya Johnson (yjohnson@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Susan Williams (scwill@uscb.edu)
Author List: Yuliya Johnson
Program: Nursing and Health Professions
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
The 2014 Surgeon General report states smoking remains the leading preventable cause of premature disease in the United States. Clinicians continue to underutilize smoking cessation methods. To enhance screening and intervention, the World Health Organization 2014 recommendations for screening and treatment were employed in a primary care setting located in the southeast. The World Health Organization toolkit (WHO 2014) entitled “Strengthening health systems for treating tobacco dependence in primary care” was selected. The toolkit contains extensive guidance for providers to help patients who are motivated to quit, to increase motivation in those not ready to quit, and to educate patients about smoking related risks and harms. After receiving education about the project, clinicians in the practice were asked to: a) screen all adult patients for smoking history, b) offer cessation options from the toolkit to active smokers, c) offer interventions for those not ready to quit smoking from the toolkit, d) offer support for patients exposed to second hand smoke from the toolkit and e) document actions taken. At the conclusion of the three-month study period, at least 85% of patient visits should show evidence of screening for smoking history and at least 90% of patients who report to be current smokers should be offered a cessation strategy from the toolkit. Data collection from paper and/or computerized records is ongoing with a projected completion date of June 1, 2017.

Abstract ID:22
Abstract Title:Retrospective Analysis of a Hospital Evacuation: The Role of the Direct Care Staff
Student:.Tracey Yazvac (TYazvac@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Susan Williams (scwill@uscb.edu)
Author List: Tracey A. Yazvac RN, Susan Roos, DNP, MS, RN, NE-BC, and Susan C. Williams, PhD, RN
Program: Nursing and Health Professions
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
Emergency Management plans provide life safety measures required by regulatory entities such as The Joint Commission. Most facilities don’t have the opportunity to analyze the effectiveness of these plans when activated in an emergency rather than a simulation. Direct care nurses and nurse managers provide critical information that affects the safety and continuity of care for all patients. Key informants of a Progressive Care Unit of a 197 bed hospital in the Southeastern United States were interviewed related to their experience during Hurricane Matthew on October 9, 2017. We also interviewed the members of the Incident Management Executive Team (IMET) who implemented the evacuation. The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate the role and impact of clinical decisions made at the bedside on the Emergency Management Plan in a hospital wide evacuation. The results indicated that the direct care nurses were not aware how their clinical assessments would be used and how that would affect the disaster plan. The nurse manager, while aware of the overall scope of the plan, was using intuitive skills to gather information rather than a formatted plan. It was also determined that the IMET relied heavily on the information gathered by the direct care staff in their application of Disaster protocols. Based on this retrospective analysis, we recommend department specific training to all levels of staff on the scope and type of clinical assessment data needed during an evacuation.

Abstract ID:42
Abstract Title:Student-led Health & Wellness Fairs: Attempting to Increase Awareness of Local Health Services
Student:.Sharonica Gavin (gavins@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Diana Reindl (DREINDL@uscb.edu)
Author List: Sharonica Gavin, Jayln Washington, Ruth Eklund, Rhianna Lewis, Jeffrey Lewis & Diana Reindl, PhD, CHES
Program: Nursing and Health Professions
Abstract Category: Descriptive

Abstract:
Background Student-led health and wellness fairs have the potential to increase awareness of local health services for all community members. Previous research on student-led health fairs have found that such events can have a measurable, positive impact on members of the community it serves (Squiers, Purmal, Silver, & Gimpel, 2015). The purpose of USCB’s annual Health & Wellness Fair is to increase health awareness through education and prevention. The purpose of this project was to evaluate vendor and attendee satisfaction of 2016 participants. Methods Four USCB bodies, the Health Promotion Club (HPC), Student Nursing Association (SNA), Athletics and Student Life co-planned the 2016 4th Annual Health and Wellness Fair. The HPC evaluated those considered as active participants of the day’s events. A master list of local health businesses and organizations was used to send invitations to 60 potential local health and wellness vendors. Alternative strategies to invite potential vendors included in-person and over the phone conversations. In total, 37 vendors participated and evaluation surveys were used to determine satisfaction among health and wellness fair participants. Results There were 136 “active participants” active being those who interacted with at least 10 vendors. Majority of active participants were students (93%), female (85%) and 18-25 (86%). A strong majority (74%) “strongly agreed” the Health and Wellness Fair educated them on new local useful resources to better their health, that it was beneficial (71%), and encouraged them toward a healthier lifestyle (60%). Conclusions Students and vendors were highly satisfied with the event. Students were satisfied in that they found the health fair to be beneficial and learned of new local useful health resources. Vendors were satisfied with the set-up and organization of the event along with the networking opportunity presented.

Abstract ID:43
Abstract Title:Factors Impacting Lesbian Health and Wellbeing: A Systematic Review
Student:.Rhiannon Lewis (lewisrn@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Diana Reindl (DREINDL@uscb.edu)
Author List: Rhiannon Lewis,Lauren Gellar, PhD, MCHES, Diana Reindl, PhD, CHES
Program: Nursing and Health Professions
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
This research examines established factors impacting lesbians’ disproportionately lower health quality as compared to the general population. Worldwide within the last decade, research highlights successes, barriers, and concerns for the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) population. However, the need for separating these groups by specific LGBT populations remains untouched.Literature was reviewed for the term lesbian and use with terms such as: “parenting” OR “marriage” OR “same sex relationships” OR “children” OR “LGBT” OR “lesbian mothers” OR “pregnancy” OR “social support” OR “alcohol” OR “drugs” OR “violence” OR “abuse” OR “community” OR “health disparities” OR “health behavior” OR “socioeconomic status”. The initial search for primary studies used the electronic databases: Academic Search Premier, BioMed Central, MEDLINE via PubMed, PsycARTICLES, PubMed, ScienceDirect, SpringerLink Taylor & Francis Online, and Wiley Online Library. Inclusion criteria for studies included: only in the United States, since 2000.Twenty-five articles met the inclusion criteria for this review. Indeed, the literature shows a high correlation of negative experiences when disclosing being LGB that affects physical and mental health. A study by Gedro, (2014) explains how stigma leads to stress which may lead to alcoholism. Other large quantitative surveys suggest lesbians have disproportionately higher rates of binge drinking, smoking, obesity, and violence (Institute of Medicine, 2011). It's likely that negative health behaviors affect other facets of life. Research suggests lesbians have lower self-perceived happiness and desire to marry when compared to heterosexuals (Pew Research Center, 2010 & 2013). Currently, no qualitative research shows psychosocial and environmental experiences contributing to disparities among self-identifying lesbians. Research focuses on quantitative measures but provides little context from lesbians themselves, leaving the correlations uncertain. Therefore, the imperative “so what?” or reasons for these findings are not clear and further research is needed to identify possible relevant explanations.

Abstract ID:44
Abstract Title:The impact of the "Sex Can Wait" Education and Prevention Intervention with Teens in Hampton County, South Carolina: The ACCESS Network
Student:.Ge`Merica Beckett (BECKETGC@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Lauren Gellar (lgellar@uscb.edu)
Author List: Ge`Merica Beckett, Ms. Gwen Bampfield, MSW, JD, Shedron D. Williams, Dr. Diana Reindl PhD, CHES, and Dr. Lauren Gellar PhD, MCHES
Program: Nursing and Health Professions
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
Background: The ACCESS Network is a nonprofit organization that helps people who are affected by HIV/AIDS live with the disease. ACCESS offers free confidential HIV testing and counseling, medical case and care management, individual and legislative advocacy, nutrition programs, group and individual support programs, subsidized housing, information and referral services, and education and prevention programs. From a health viewpoint, early sexual activity among adolescents is a potential problem because of the risk of teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. Methods: The ACCESS Network “Sex Can Wait” education and prevention program is taught by staff’s member of the ACCESS Network at Estill and Hampton middle and high school. 97 students participated in this program. “Sex Can Wait” is taught after school at Estill and Hampton middle schools and once a year at Estill and Hampton high schools. Students earned extra points to their overall grades for participating. Topics discussed included safe sex, teen pregnancy, and sexually transmitted infections. The ACCESS Network developed a 10 item pre- test and post-test questionnaire to test the impact of the intervention on knowledge of the “Sex Can Wait” lessons. Results: Of the 97 students who participated in this program, 62 completed the pre and posttest questionnaires. Over half of the adolescents who attended the ACCESS Network “Sex Can Wait” education and prevention program increased knowledge from the pre- test to post-test. Student learned new information about sex and will take steps majority of the time while sexually active to prevent HIV/AIDs. Overall both Estill and Hampton middle and high school increased knowledge by 45%. Conclusion: The ACCESS Network “Sex Can Wait” education and prevention program increased the knowledge on safe sex, teen pregnancy, and sexually transmitted infections. Additional research on the impact of this program with a larger population and is warranted.

Abstract ID:46
Abstract Title:Mock Disaster Toolbox: Simulation of a Hospital Evacuation
Student:.Charles Chaney (chaneyc@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Pamela Phillips (pphillip@uscb.edu)
Author List: Charles Chaney & Braden Childers
Program: Nursing and Health Professions
Abstract Category: Innovation Application

Abstract:
A script for a mock disaster has been created for nursing students for education and practice of a hospital evacuation. Situations that can call for a hospital evacuation can vary: severe weather events, earthquakes, fires, flooding, or even terrorism. Since these events are extraordinary, mock disasters can be a useful tool in preparing health care personnel for an evacuation. It has been shown that incorporating disaster preparedness for nursing students in course content is an effective educational tool. In this mock disaster, the simulation hospital unit to be evacuated has five patients that need to be transported. There are limited resources to transfer the patients to a different hospital or other location for care. This is designed to simulate the concept of limited resources and patient prioritization, which is what occurs during an actual disaster. This simulation is intended for senior nursing students, as it incorporates patients from many medical specialties. The targeted educational outcomes from this simulation are critical thinking, utilization of nursing assessments, early recognition of medical conditions, and effective communication. These educational outcomes will all be used in a career in nursing. The pilot mock disaster was well received by the senior nursing students at the University of South Carolina - Beaufort and was perceived as a valuable educational experience, which was reflected in the evaluation forms. This script has all the information needed for any nursing school to organize a disaster evacuation simulation in which their students can participate.

Abstract ID:49
Abstract Title:Barriers to Attendance at Peer-based Support Groups During Substance Abuse Treatment.
Student:.Oxana Dickey (odickey@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Susan Williams (scwill@uscb.edu)
Author List: Oxana Dickey
Program: Nursing and Health Professions
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
Substance use disorder is a complex disease, and quitting usually takes more than good intentions or a strong will. Peer support is a structured relationship in which people meet in order to provide or exchange emotional support with others facing similar challenges. Examples of peer support are self-help groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), Narcotic Anonymous (NA), and others. Current research indicates that active participation in any type of peer support group increases the likelihood that members will abstain from alcohol and drugs. Patients’ daily schedule during inpatient treatment for substance abuse includes attendance at peer-based therapy groups. However, some patients are resistant to this type of therapy during their hospitalization. This study explores barriers to in-patient attendance at peer-based therapy groups. Using a convenience sample of 10 participants with a primary diagnosis of substance abuse disorder, qualitative and quantitative data will be collected. Data collection will include participants’ responses to a Likert-type scale questionnaire and exploration of participants‘ perspectives on personal barriers to group attendance through the use of individual participant interviews. The qualitative interview data will be analyzed by interpreting participant information and relating it to the main objectives of the study; this may also involve identifying patterns of association between and among participant responses. The quantitative questionnaire data will be analyzed by interval data measurement and tabulation (frequency distributions & percent distributions). Analysis of the data could suggest new strategies to improve patient attendance and participation in peer-based group therapy. Findings will be shared with the staff of an in-patient behavioral health facility located in the Southeast.

Abstract ID:61
Abstract Title:The Effects of A Stress Management Program on Post Injury Patients at The New River Wellness Institute
Student:.jamie Saarloos (saarloos@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Lauren Gellar (lgellar@uscb.edu)
Author List: Jamie Saarloos and Dr. Lauren Gellar
Program: Nursing and Health Professions
Abstract Category: Hypothesis Driven

Abstract:
Introduction Recovering from an injury can be a major source of stress. According to the American Psychological Association, stress has a physical effect on several systems in our body, which can specifically affect your physical recovery and progress in physical therapy. It is important for patients to recognize stress and practice positive stress management techniques to decrease and prevent stress to increase quality of life and injury prevention. Methods The stress management program included the physical therapy patients recovering from an injury at the New River Wellness Institute. Fliers were posted around the facility to advertise this program. The program was conducted with individual patients after their physical therapy appointment. A pretest containing questions about their current stress levels, practices, and knowledge about stress management was completed. Next, the participant was guided though a breathing exercise. Then the patients received an educational packet and go over the content. After the packet was read and explained, the patient was asked to take a two-week pledge towards stress management. Participants completed a stress management technique everyday and kept a participant log. Patients completed a posttest at two weeks follow up and the pledge was collected. Results 15 total patients participated in the stress management program. Out of the 15 involved only one patient did not sign the two-week pledge. Results from the Pre and Posttest show that participant’s positive stress management practices have increased. Discussion and Lessons learned A stress management program on post injury patients was effective on increasing positive stress management practices. For future implementation of this program, interventionists should advertise this program at least a week prior to implementation to improve recruitment. Additionally, it would be beneficial to implement a pilot of the program with the target population to insure comprehension and to make any needed adjustments.

Abstract ID:62
Abstract Title:Healthy Eating on a Budget; the Impact of the Healthy Columbia Cheap Eats Program in Richland County, South Carolina.
Student:.Ayanna Thomas (thoma583@uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Lauren Gellar (lgellar@uscb.edu)
Author List: Ayanna Thomas, Dr. Lauren Gellar
Program: Nursing and Health Professions
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
Background: Approximately 17% of individuals in Richland County, South Carolina are food insecure. Furthermore, 54% of South Carolina’s elderly population cannot afford to pay for both medicine and food. The Cheap Eats program was designed to provide nutritious meal plans that would fit a Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) candidates monthly budget. SNAP provides over 46 million low-income participants, more than 840,000 in South Carolina, with monthly benefits. The Cheap Eats program strives to reduce stress for hard-working or unemployed individuals coping with poverty. The purpose of the study was to assess the impact of a 7-day meal plan emphasizing healthy food choices on a budget of $5.00 a day for low socioeconomic community in Richland County. Methods: A total of 12 out of 22 patients from Healthy Columbia’s Health Screening received the meal plan and tested the recipes at 7 days. The Cheap Eats program lasted 1 day at the health screening, we educated individuals on healthy eating on a budget of $5.00 a day. Eating behaviors along with usage of the meal plan was assessed with questionnaires. The primary outcome measure was usage of the 7-day meal plan. Secondary measures were attendance of health screening. Results: 12 total patients reported using the cheap eats meal plan. Results from the pre-and posttest demonstrate there was 75% usage on at least one of the recipes from the $5.00 a day meal plan. Lessons Learned: Future implementation of this program should give patients additional time to analyze meal plans. To increase knowledge additional nutrition education should be provided and to increase mastery of experience, cooking skills should be practiced. Assessment was completed via phone, completing assessment in person may be beneficial. Conclusion: The Cheap Eats program can assist a low socioeconomic community in learning how to eat healthy on a budget.

Abstract ID:3
Abstract Title:Dog Ownership Decreases Aggressive Feelings In The Workplace
Student:.Nathaniel Cooper (ncooper@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Carey Fitzgerald (cfitzger@uscb.edu)
Author List: Carey J. Fitzgerald, Nathaniel T. Cooper, Ashley Russell
Program: Social Sciences
Abstract Category: Hypothesis Driven

Abstract:
Research suggests that the presence of pets can decrease people’s stress responses (Miller et al., 2009) and increase cooperation among groups of people working together (Fitzgerald & Danner, 2012). The present study is aimed to investigate whether the presence of one’s pet dog or cat may decrease angry feelings and aggressive behaviors in the workplace. Due to dogs and cats being prohibited in many workplaces, this study is investigating the effects of dog/cat photographs on participants’ emotions and behaviors. Participants were assigned to one of five conditions – these conditions will dictate which image the participants are exposed to while they complete a writing task: 1) Photo of the participant’s dog, 2) Photo of the participant’s cat, 3) Photo of a random dog, 4) photo of a random cat, or 5) Blank screen (Control). N = 201 participants were then asked to write two essays about things that make them very angry. This writing task has been shown in previous research to produce angry feelings in people (Dunn & Schweitzer, 2005). The image or blank screen will remain on the computer screen (full screen) until the entire writing task is completed. After they have completed the writing task, the participants answered a series of questions designed to measure their emotional states (State Anger Scale) and their responses to a series of hypothetical aggressive workplace scenarios in which they are being insulted by a coworker (from Fitzgerald & Ketterer, 2011). Participants who viewed a photo of their own dog reported significantly lower levels of aggression on multiple measures, including state anger and aggressive responses to multiple hypothetical scenarios in which a co-worker insults them.

Abstract ID:4
Abstract Title:Evidence For A Psychophysical Pathogen-Avoidance Mechanism
Student:.Brittany Lorentz (blorentz@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Carey Fitzgerald (cfitzger@uscb.edu)
Author List: Brittany Lorentz
Program: Social Sciences
Abstract Category: Hypothesis Driven

Abstract:
Have you ever noticed that kitchen tap water from the sink always tasted different form the water in the bathroom? Humans possess innate disgust mechanisms that aid human survival by keeping us away from things that may possess harmful pathogens (Oaten et al., 2009). Participants were seated in front of a computer and five disposable plastic cups – each labeled with a single number (i.e., 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5). Each cup contained 100mL of bottled spring water (NO Water was from campus sources). Participants were told that these five cups contained water from five different sources of drinking water on campus. These images included: 1) a kitchen sink from the campus dining commons, 2) a sink from the campus library men’s restroom, 3) a sink from the campus library women’s restroom, 4) a drinking fountain from the campus dining commons, 5) a drinking fountain from the campus library. The results from the study reflect the possible existence of a perceptual pathogen avoidance mechanism. Participants consistently rated the quality, cleanliness, crispness, and enjoyment of the supposed drinking fountain water as significantly greater than the water they believed was from other sources indicative of higher pathogen prevalence. They also ingested significantly more water from the two “drinking fountain” cups than the other three cups. Therefore, this data points to participants’ gustatory perception being linked to their perception of cleanliness of the water source.

Abstract ID:5
Abstract Title:What's in a name?
Student:.Katelyn Edmond (kedmond@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Jody Thompson (JTHOMPSO@uscb.edu)
Author List: Jody Thompson, Katelyn Edmond, Ragan Jarratt, Maria Chowansky, Miriam Williams
Program: Social Sciences
Abstract Category: Hypothesis Driven

Abstract:
Baby naming has become a growing lucrative industry in which individuals can earn income by suggesting appropriate and/or popular baby names to new parents (see Wattenberg, 2013 for an example). However, all scientific research on names, to date, has not examined whether parents’ personalities may influence their preferences for more popular, unique, or traditional baby names. The present study investigated potential correlations between individuals’ personality traits (Five Factor Model and Dark Triad) and their preferences for popular, unique, and traditional baby names. Conscientiousness and Neuroticism were not correlated with baby name preferences. However, Extraversion and Agreeableness were positively correlated with uniqueness of baby names. Extraversion was also positively correlated with popularity of baby names. Openness was negatively correlated with popularity and positively correlated with traditionality. Narcissism was positively correlated with uniqueness baby names. Exploratory analyses also revealed some noteworthy results. This study provides – to our knowledge – the first evidence of parental personality traits being linked to their preferences in baby names.

Abstract ID:6
Abstract Title:People Driving Expensive Cars are Blamed Less for Their Car Accidents
Student:.Christian Dammel (cdammel@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Carey Fitzgerald (cfitzger@uscb.edu)
Author List: Christian Dammel
Program: Social Sciences
Abstract Category: Hypothesis Driven

Abstract:
Experimental evidence indicates that many individuals have a positive preference for high status individuals (Jost, Pelham, & Carvallo, 2002). The following study sought to examine if this perceptual bias would appear in perceptions of a car accident. Participants (N = 122) were presented with a fictional scenario regarding a car accident. Participants were then shown a picture of the vehicle prior to the accident. Half of the participants saw a 2015 BMW Alpina B7 (valued at approximately $250,000), while the other half saw a dilapidated 1997 Dodge Neon (valued at approximately $1,000). After viewing the vehicle, participants were asked to answer a series of inferential questions regarding the driver, such as “To what degree do you think this driver is at fault for the accident? “, as well as “To what degree do you think the driver is telling the truth? “, and “Is this driver a cautious driver?”, among others. Results indicated that participants rated the driver of the low status car (1997 Dodge Neon) as significantly more at fault for the accident, and significantly more responsible for the damages, than the driver of the high status car (2015 BMW Alpina B7). However, participants also indicated that the driver of the high status car as significantly less honest than the driver of the low status car. These results are indicative of individuals’ stereotyping in regards to socioeconomic status. Individuals lower on the socioeconomic ladder are often stereotyped as careless and irresponsible (and thus more at fault for a car accident), while individuals who are higher in socioeconomic status are often stereotyped as dishonest. This study illustrates how stereotyping can influence individuals’ judgments of other people even during unfortunate and circumstances such as car accident.

Abstract ID:12
Abstract Title:Math, Stress, and Mindfulness, OH MY!: Mindfulness and Stress Reduction
Student:.Katherine Brophy (kbrophy@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Jody Thompson (JTHOMPSO@uscb.edu)
Author List: Jody Thompson, Ph.D., E. Alexandria Cozanitis, Ashley Russell, Brittany Lorentz, Jada Williams, and Katie Brophy
Program: Social Sciences
Abstract Category: Hypothesis Driven

Abstract:
Mindfulness has been shown to improve psychological well-being (Brown & Ryan, 2003), decrease implicit racism and ageism (Lueke & Gibson, 2014), and help with addiction (Cropley et al., 2007). The present study seeks to examine whether mindfulness can help students cope with math anxiety. Data collection is currently ongoing, but data is beginning to show trends that mindfulness may helps students cope for very short periods of time, but further investigation is needed. According to Kabat-Zinn “Mindfulness means paying attention in a particular way; on purpose, in the present moment, and nonjudgmentally” (1994, p. 15). Someone in a mindful state is more sensitive to the perspective and circumstance of his or her behavior. There is an enhanced ability to see ideas and emotions more objectively. The individual can then ruminate on those cognitive actions as ephemeral and distinct events (Bishop, et al., 2004). Bishop, et al. proposed a two part model of mindfulness. The first part is a concentration of attention on the present and consideration of all thoughts and ideas that cross your mind. The second is an openness toward those thoughts that avoids preconceived notions.

Abstract ID:21
Abstract Title:Gender Differences in Mindfulness Training and Risky Self-Concept
Student:.Miriam Williams (miriamw@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Jody Thompson (JTHOMPSO@uscb.edu)
Author List: Miram Williams, Katie Brophy, Dr. Jody Thompson
Program: Social Sciences
Abstract Category: Hypothesis Driven

Abstract:
The concept of mindfulness was derived from the Buddhist teachings of Dharma. Through Dharma, a practice of meditation for the awareness and understanding of the internal self, one is acutely mindful of self. Mindfulness-induction has been shown to increase attention and awareness (Brown & Ryan, 2003) and increased levels of attention and awareness have been shown to greatly decrease automaticity (Chambers, et al., 2008). Awareness, being a key part of mindfulness, should be related to the reduction of automatic tendencies. Automatization is described as the capacity to engage in a behavior without being consciously aware of it. While individuals may be typically described as being in a state of automaticity (Langer & Abelson, 1974), de-automatization is possible (Moskowitz & Li, 2011). Mindfulness training and the control participants were separated by participants listening to an audio recording to induce state mindfulness or a neutral audio recording (Cropley, Ussher, & Charitou, 2007). The Risk self-concept implicit associations test (Horcajo,et al., 2014) allows for the study of how much participants automatically associate the self with risky or safe actions. Using IAT has allowed for experimenters to test the extent to which risk as become part of the active self-concept in participants. The purpose of this study was to find if there were differences in the risky self-concept of males and females and if mindfulness would alter the risky self-concept in males and females differently. Results of this study showed an interaction of sex and mindfulness training did occur at the p < .056 level. Findings were that males and females were practically identical in their risky self-concept when they received no mindfulness training. However, females that received mindfulness training were much more risk averse. Males that received mindfulness training remained at a similar level to males and females without mindfulness training.

Abstract ID:32
Abstract Title:Discrimination inside the African-American Community
Student:.Tilia Powell (tcpowell@email.sc.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Najmah Thomas (nthomas2@uscb.edu)
Author List: Tilia Powell
Program: Social Sciences
Abstract Category: Issue Based

Abstract:
Over the past centuries, there has been some controversy about the relationship between racism and colorism. Colorism is not a synonym for racism. This silent bias rarely gets much attention but it plays a significant role in the world of racism. Colorism is prejudice or discrimination against individuals with a darker skin tone, typically among people within the same ethnic or racial group. Its social meaning based on the skin color can be defined as an internalized form of racism or a result of white supremacy. Colorism has made a huge impact within the African American population surrounded by their emotional and psychological battles. This problem has left confusion, shame and pain inside the black community. Courage and honesty is at the core of strategies to end colorism. Regardless of the race or color, colorism has been perpetuated in many ways. It has influenced today’s society in politics, education, healthcare, crime and violence and the media. In order to heal colorism, people need to start acknowledging these problems and finding a solution to address it to the public.

Abstract ID:39
Abstract Title:Systematic Observation of Communication Between Soccer Players and Coaches at the High School and Collegiate Levels
Student:.Cameron Crony-Clark (cronycc@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Brett Borton (bortonb@uscb.edu)
Author List: Cameron Crony-Clark
Program: Social Sciences
Abstract Category: Descriptive

Abstract:
Effective communication has been identified as a critical part of talent development in young soccer players and is often tied to player achievements and well-being. Researchers have systematically observed coach behavior in both practice and game situations, but little research has been done on the different communication styles required for high school and college players. The purpose of this research is to identify the styles and patterns of effective communication, both verbal and non-verbal, between and among coaches and players at the high school and college levels. Using systematic observation, the research seeks to determine how communication is used to build player/coach and player/player relationships, and the differences in communication at the high school and college level. The analysis will consider elements of verbal communication (delivery, tone, positive and negative content as feedback) and non-verbal (body language, facial expressions, hand gestures, eye contact). Other variables to be considered include player efficacy (knowledge of the sport), maturity, willingness to learn, and parental involvement.

Abstract ID:40
Abstract Title:Are We Getting Through to You? Analyzing the Effectiveness of Student Evaluations at USCB in the Communication Studies Department
Student:.Courtney Suber (murrayc8@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Brett Borton (bortonb@uscb.edu)
Author List: Courtney M. Suber
Program: Social Sciences
Abstract Category: Descriptive

Abstract:
This study examines the effectiveness of student evaluations on teaching practices as well as course/curriculum improvement in USCB’s Communication Studies program. The study uses a mixed methods approach. Quantitative data has been obtained through an online survey of Communication Studies majors and descriptive analysis used to measure levels of satisfaction of program courses and curriculum. This data is supplemented by in-depth interviews with a random sample of Communication Studies majors to gain a deeper understanding of the perceptions of the program in terms of gained knowledge and acquired skills. The objective is to determine the impact of student feedback on the Communication Studies program and the degree to which faculty members use this feedback to create a more effective curriculum. Future studies should take a longitudinal approach to assess how courses/curricula and teaching methods have evolved as a result of student feedback.

Abstract ID:64
Abstract Title:“Let’s Make A Slave:” Hegemony, Self-Concept and the Lingering Effects of the Willie Lynch Letter.
Student:.Anthony Outing (aouting@email.uscb.edu)
Faculty Mentor:.Brett Borton (bortonb@uscb.edu)
Author List: Anthony Outing
Program: Social Sciences
Abstract Category: Descriptive

Abstract:
This study is a critical analysis of the William Lynch Letter, a directive written for and delivered to slave owners in Virginia in 1712. Its objective was to instruct white “masters” on how to control the minds of black slaves by promoting distrust, envy, fear and hatred. While there is skepticism as to the validity of the letter, and little has been done on its historical impact, there are striking parallels between the rhetoric in the letter and a hegemonic agenda that remains in place today. Sections of the letter will be analyzed and discussed in relation to the power of hegemony and its impact on generations of African Americans. The researcher, a young African American male, argues that the powerful rhetoric expressed through the letter has shaped how African Americans view themselves (and how others view them) and how they communicate with others both inside and outside of their ethnic community.